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Selenium and lung cancer: a quantitative analysis of heterogeneity in the current epidemiological literature.

Abstract

While numerous laboratory investigations have shown that selenium may have anticarcinogenic activity, the epidemiological data have been inconsistent. In this report, meta-analysis was used to quantitatively summarize the existing epidemiological evidence on selenium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were combined, the summary relative risk (RR) for subjects with higher selenium exposures was 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.97]. In subgroup analyses based on the average selenium level in the study population, the summary RR for areas where selenium levels were low was 0.72 (95% CI 0.45-1.16), while the RR for areas where selenium levels were higher was 0.86 (95% CI 0.61-1.22). In both studies in high selenium areas where RRs were markedly below 1.0, protective effects were only found when subjects in the lowest category of selenium exposure were used as referents. No clear protective effects were seen when highly exposed subjects were compared with those in the middle exposure categories. The summary RR was lower in studies assessing selenium exposure using toenails (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.87) than in studies using serum selenium (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.58-1.10) or studies assessing dietary intake (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.77-1.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer in populations where average selenium levels are low. The evidence for these findings is greater in studies of toenail selenium than in studies involving other measures of exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, University of California, 140 Warren Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-7360, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15159309

Citation

Zhuo, Hanjing, et al. "Selenium and Lung Cancer: a Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological Literature." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 13, no. 5, 2004, pp. 771-8.
Zhuo H, Smith AH, Steinmaus C. Selenium and lung cancer: a quantitative analysis of heterogeneity in the current epidemiological literature. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(5):771-8.
Zhuo, H., Smith, A. H., & Steinmaus, C. (2004). Selenium and lung cancer: a quantitative analysis of heterogeneity in the current epidemiological literature. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 13(5), pp. 771-8.
Zhuo H, Smith AH, Steinmaus C. Selenium and Lung Cancer: a Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological Literature. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(5):771-8. PubMed PMID: 15159309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selenium and lung cancer: a quantitative analysis of heterogeneity in the current epidemiological literature. AU - Zhuo,Hanjing, AU - Smith,Allan H, AU - Steinmaus,Craig, PY - 2004/5/26/pubmed PY - 2004/9/8/medline PY - 2004/5/26/entrez SP - 771 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 13 IS - 5 N2 - While numerous laboratory investigations have shown that selenium may have anticarcinogenic activity, the epidemiological data have been inconsistent. In this report, meta-analysis was used to quantitatively summarize the existing epidemiological evidence on selenium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were combined, the summary relative risk (RR) for subjects with higher selenium exposures was 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.97]. In subgroup analyses based on the average selenium level in the study population, the summary RR for areas where selenium levels were low was 0.72 (95% CI 0.45-1.16), while the RR for areas where selenium levels were higher was 0.86 (95% CI 0.61-1.22). In both studies in high selenium areas where RRs were markedly below 1.0, protective effects were only found when subjects in the lowest category of selenium exposure were used as referents. No clear protective effects were seen when highly exposed subjects were compared with those in the middle exposure categories. The summary RR was lower in studies assessing selenium exposure using toenails (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.87) than in studies using serum selenium (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.58-1.10) or studies assessing dietary intake (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.77-1.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer in populations where average selenium levels are low. The evidence for these findings is greater in studies of toenail selenium than in studies involving other measures of exposure. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15159309/Selenium_and_lung_cancer:_a_quantitative_analysis_of_heterogeneity_in_the_current_epidemiological_literature_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15159309 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -