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High-altitude illness.
Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2004 May; 22(2):329-55, viii.EM

Abstract

Travel to a high altitude requires that the human body acclimatize to hypobaric hypoxia. Failure to acclimatize results in three common but preventable maladies known collectively as high-altitude illness: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Capillary leakage in the brain (AMS/HACE) or lungs (HAPE) accounts for these syndromes. The morbidity and mortality associated with high-altitude illness are significant and unfortunate, given they are preventable. Practitioners working in or advising those traveling to a high altitude must be familiar with the early recognition of symptoms, prompt and appropriate therapy, and proper preventative measures for high-altitude illness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, Aspen Valley Hospital, CO 81611, USA. docgliv@excite.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15163571

Citation

Gallagher, Scott A., and Peter H. Hackett. "High-altitude Illness." Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, vol. 22, no. 2, 2004, pp. 329-55, viii.
Gallagher SA, Hackett PH. High-altitude illness. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2004;22(2):329-55, viii.
Gallagher, S. A., & Hackett, P. H. (2004). High-altitude illness. Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, 22(2), 329-55, viii.
Gallagher SA, Hackett PH. High-altitude Illness. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2004;22(2):329-55, viii. PubMed PMID: 15163571.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-altitude illness. AU - Gallagher,Scott A, AU - Hackett,Peter H, PY - 2004/5/28/pubmed PY - 2004/7/28/medline PY - 2004/5/28/entrez SP - 329-55, viii JF - Emergency medicine clinics of North America JO - Emerg. Med. Clin. North Am. VL - 22 IS - 2 N2 - Travel to a high altitude requires that the human body acclimatize to hypobaric hypoxia. Failure to acclimatize results in three common but preventable maladies known collectively as high-altitude illness: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Capillary leakage in the brain (AMS/HACE) or lungs (HAPE) accounts for these syndromes. The morbidity and mortality associated with high-altitude illness are significant and unfortunate, given they are preventable. Practitioners working in or advising those traveling to a high altitude must be familiar with the early recognition of symptoms, prompt and appropriate therapy, and proper preventative measures for high-altitude illness. SN - 0733-8627 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15163571/High_altitude_illness_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -