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Physical activity and stroke. A meta-analysis of observational data.
Int J Epidemiol 2004; 33(4):787-98IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Based on studies published so far, the protective effect of physical activity on stroke remains controversial. Specifically, there is a lack of insight into the sources of heterogeneity between studies.

METHODS

Meta-analysis of observational studies was used to quantify the relationship between physical activity and stroke and to explore sources of heterogeneity. In total, 31 relevant publications were included. Risk estimates and study characteristics were extracted from original studies and converted to a standard format for use in a central database.

RESULTS

Moderately intense physical activity compared with inactivity, showed a protective effect on total stroke for both occupational (RR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.48-0.87) and leisure time physical activity (RR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.78-0.93). High level occupational physical activity protected against ischaemic stroke compared with both moderate (RR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.60-0.98) and inactive occupational levels (RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.43-0.77). High level compared with low level leisure time physical activity protected against total stroke (RR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.71-0.85), haemorrhagic stroke (RR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.57-0.96) as well as ischaemic stroke (RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.69-0.91). Studies conducted in Europe showed a stronger protective effect (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.33-0.66) than studies conducted in the US (RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.75-0.90).

CONCLUSIONS

Lack of physical activity is a modifiable risk factor for both total stroke and stroke subtypes. Moderately intense physical activity is sufficient to achieve risk reduction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. Wanda.Vos@rivm.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15166195

Citation

Wendel-Vos, G C W., et al. "Physical Activity and Stroke. a Meta-analysis of Observational Data." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 33, no. 4, 2004, pp. 787-98.
Wendel-Vos GC, Schuit AJ, Feskens EJ, et al. Physical activity and stroke. A meta-analysis of observational data. Int J Epidemiol. 2004;33(4):787-98.
Wendel-Vos, G. C., Schuit, A. J., Feskens, E. J., Boshuizen, H. C., Verschuren, W. M., Saris, W. H., & Kromhout, D. (2004). Physical activity and stroke. A meta-analysis of observational data. International Journal of Epidemiology, 33(4), pp. 787-98.
Wendel-Vos GC, et al. Physical Activity and Stroke. a Meta-analysis of Observational Data. Int J Epidemiol. 2004;33(4):787-98. PubMed PMID: 15166195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity and stroke. A meta-analysis of observational data. AU - Wendel-Vos,G C W, AU - Schuit,A J, AU - Feskens,E J M, AU - Boshuizen,H C, AU - Verschuren,W M M, AU - Saris,W H M, AU - Kromhout,D, Y1 - 2004/05/27/ PY - 2004/5/29/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/5/29/entrez SP - 787 EP - 98 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Based on studies published so far, the protective effect of physical activity on stroke remains controversial. Specifically, there is a lack of insight into the sources of heterogeneity between studies. METHODS: Meta-analysis of observational studies was used to quantify the relationship between physical activity and stroke and to explore sources of heterogeneity. In total, 31 relevant publications were included. Risk estimates and study characteristics were extracted from original studies and converted to a standard format for use in a central database. RESULTS: Moderately intense physical activity compared with inactivity, showed a protective effect on total stroke for both occupational (RR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.48-0.87) and leisure time physical activity (RR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.78-0.93). High level occupational physical activity protected against ischaemic stroke compared with both moderate (RR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.60-0.98) and inactive occupational levels (RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.43-0.77). High level compared with low level leisure time physical activity protected against total stroke (RR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.71-0.85), haemorrhagic stroke (RR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.57-0.96) as well as ischaemic stroke (RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.69-0.91). Studies conducted in Europe showed a stronger protective effect (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.33-0.66) than studies conducted in the US (RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.75-0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Lack of physical activity is a modifiable risk factor for both total stroke and stroke subtypes. Moderately intense physical activity is sufficient to achieve risk reduction. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15166195/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyh168 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -