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Is dietary fat intake related to liking or household availability of high- and low-fat foods?
Obes Res 2004; 12(5):816-23OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Despite the increasing availability of low- and reduced-fat foods, Americans continue to consume more fat than recommended, which may be a contributing factor to the obesity epidemic. This investigation examined relationships between liking and household availability of high- and low-fat foods and their association with dietary fat intake.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

A food frequency questionnaire assessed percent calories from fat consumed over the past year in 85 men and 80 women. Participants reported their degree of liking 22 "high-fat foods" (>45% calories from fat) and 22 "low-fat foods" (<18% calories from fat), and the number and percentage (number of high- or low-fat foods/total number of foods x 100) of these high- and low-fat foods in their homes.

RESULTS

Hierarchical regression analyses examined the ability of liking and household availability of low- and high-fat foods to predict percent dietary fat intake. After controlling for age, sex, and BMI, liking ratings for high- and low-fat foods and the interaction of liking for low-fat foods by the percentage of low-fat foods in the household were significant predictors of percent dietary fat consumed. Greater liking of high-fat foods and lower liking of low-fat foods, both alone and combined with a lower percentage of low-fat foods in the home, were predictive of higher dietary fat intake.

DISCUSSION

Interventions designed to reduce dietary fat intake should target both decreasing liking for high-fat foods and increasing liking for low-fat foods, along with increasing the proportion of low-fat foods in the household.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, and Human Behavior, Brown University, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. hraynor@lifespan.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15166302

Citation

Raynor, Hollie A., et al. "Is Dietary Fat Intake Related to Liking or Household Availability of High- and Low-fat Foods?" Obesity Research, vol. 12, no. 5, 2004, pp. 816-23.
Raynor HA, Polley BA, Wing RR, et al. Is dietary fat intake related to liking or household availability of high- and low-fat foods? Obes Res. 2004;12(5):816-23.
Raynor, H. A., Polley, B. A., Wing, R. R., & Jeffery, R. W. (2004). Is dietary fat intake related to liking or household availability of high- and low-fat foods? Obesity Research, 12(5), pp. 816-23.
Raynor HA, et al. Is Dietary Fat Intake Related to Liking or Household Availability of High- and Low-fat Foods. Obes Res. 2004;12(5):816-23. PubMed PMID: 15166302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is dietary fat intake related to liking or household availability of high- and low-fat foods? AU - Raynor,Hollie A, AU - Polley,Betsy A, AU - Wing,Rena R, AU - Jeffery,Robert W, PY - 2004/5/29/pubmed PY - 2004/10/7/medline PY - 2004/5/29/entrez SP - 816 EP - 23 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes. Res. VL - 12 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Despite the increasing availability of low- and reduced-fat foods, Americans continue to consume more fat than recommended, which may be a contributing factor to the obesity epidemic. This investigation examined relationships between liking and household availability of high- and low-fat foods and their association with dietary fat intake. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A food frequency questionnaire assessed percent calories from fat consumed over the past year in 85 men and 80 women. Participants reported their degree of liking 22 "high-fat foods" (>45% calories from fat) and 22 "low-fat foods" (<18% calories from fat), and the number and percentage (number of high- or low-fat foods/total number of foods x 100) of these high- and low-fat foods in their homes. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses examined the ability of liking and household availability of low- and high-fat foods to predict percent dietary fat intake. After controlling for age, sex, and BMI, liking ratings for high- and low-fat foods and the interaction of liking for low-fat foods by the percentage of low-fat foods in the household were significant predictors of percent dietary fat consumed. Greater liking of high-fat foods and lower liking of low-fat foods, both alone and combined with a lower percentage of low-fat foods in the home, were predictive of higher dietary fat intake. DISCUSSION: Interventions designed to reduce dietary fat intake should target both decreasing liking for high-fat foods and increasing liking for low-fat foods, along with increasing the proportion of low-fat foods in the household. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15166302/Is_dietary_fat_intake_related_to_liking_or_household_availability_of_high__and_low_fat_foods L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2004.98 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -