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Milk protein quality in low birth weight infants: effects of protein-fortified human milk and formulas with three different whey-to-casein ratios on growth and plasma amino acid profiles.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1992 May; 14(4):450-5.JP

Abstract

Growth rates (weight, length, and head circumference) and selected biochemical indexes of protein metabolism (serum urea, acid-base status, and plasma amino acid concentrations) were determined in low birth weight (LBW) infants appropriate for gestational age (birth weight less than 1,650 g) fed three formulas differing only in the whey-to-casein ratios: 60/40, 50/50, and 35/65. A group of infants fed exclusively human milk protein (HMP)-fortified human milk was used as a control. All diets provided similar daily protein and energy intakes, which were 3.5 g/kg and 122 kcal/kg in the human milk-fed infants and 3.3 g/kg and 121 kcal/kg in the formula-fed infants. Neither weight gain nor rate of growth in length and head circumference differed between the feeding groups and reached intrauterine or better rates in all groups. Values for serum urea and acid-base status were normal and also did not differ among the groups. At the end of the study, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly higher in all formula-fed infants than in the infants fed human milk. The highest plasma threonine concentration was found in the infants receiving the whey-predominant formula. Plasma concentrations of valine, methionine, and phenylalanine were also significantly higher in all formula-fed groups when compared with the human milk group. Plasma total essential amino acid concentrations were also significantly higher in the formula-fed infants than in the human milk fed. The results show that protein quality does not affect growth rate or biochemical indexes of metabolic tolerance in LBW infants fed adequate protein and energy intakes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Palermo, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1517949

Citation

Priolisi, A, et al. "Milk Protein Quality in Low Birth Weight Infants: Effects of Protein-fortified Human Milk and Formulas With Three Different Whey-to-casein Ratios On Growth and Plasma Amino Acid Profiles." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 14, no. 4, 1992, pp. 450-5.
Priolisi A, Didato M, Gioeli R, et al. Milk protein quality in low birth weight infants: effects of protein-fortified human milk and formulas with three different whey-to-casein ratios on growth and plasma amino acid profiles. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1992;14(4):450-5.
Priolisi, A., Didato, M., Gioeli, R., Fazzolari-Nesci, A., & Räihä, N. C. (1992). Milk protein quality in low birth weight infants: effects of protein-fortified human milk and formulas with three different whey-to-casein ratios on growth and plasma amino acid profiles. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 14(4), 450-5.
Priolisi A, et al. Milk Protein Quality in Low Birth Weight Infants: Effects of Protein-fortified Human Milk and Formulas With Three Different Whey-to-casein Ratios On Growth and Plasma Amino Acid Profiles. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1992;14(4):450-5. PubMed PMID: 1517949.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Milk protein quality in low birth weight infants: effects of protein-fortified human milk and formulas with three different whey-to-casein ratios on growth and plasma amino acid profiles. AU - Priolisi,A, AU - Didato,M, AU - Gioeli,R, AU - Fazzolari-Nesci,A, AU - Räihä,N C, PY - 1992/5/1/pubmed PY - 1992/5/1/medline PY - 1992/5/1/entrez SP - 450 EP - 5 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - Growth rates (weight, length, and head circumference) and selected biochemical indexes of protein metabolism (serum urea, acid-base status, and plasma amino acid concentrations) were determined in low birth weight (LBW) infants appropriate for gestational age (birth weight less than 1,650 g) fed three formulas differing only in the whey-to-casein ratios: 60/40, 50/50, and 35/65. A group of infants fed exclusively human milk protein (HMP)-fortified human milk was used as a control. All diets provided similar daily protein and energy intakes, which were 3.5 g/kg and 122 kcal/kg in the human milk-fed infants and 3.3 g/kg and 121 kcal/kg in the formula-fed infants. Neither weight gain nor rate of growth in length and head circumference differed between the feeding groups and reached intrauterine or better rates in all groups. Values for serum urea and acid-base status were normal and also did not differ among the groups. At the end of the study, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly higher in all formula-fed infants than in the infants fed human milk. The highest plasma threonine concentration was found in the infants receiving the whey-predominant formula. Plasma concentrations of valine, methionine, and phenylalanine were also significantly higher in all formula-fed groups when compared with the human milk group. Plasma total essential amino acid concentrations were also significantly higher in the formula-fed infants than in the human milk fed. The results show that protein quality does not affect growth rate or biochemical indexes of metabolic tolerance in LBW infants fed adequate protein and energy intakes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0277-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1517949/Milk_protein_quality_in_low_birth_weight_infants:_effects_of_protein_fortified_human_milk_and_formulas_with_three_different_whey_to_casein_ratios_on_growth_and_plasma_amino_acid_profiles_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=1517949.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -