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WBC count and the risk of cancer mortality in a national sample of U.S. adults: results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey mortality study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Jun; 13(6):1052-6.CE

Abstract

Inflammation has been shown to be a risk factor for several chronic diseases. Few epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between markers of inflammation and cancer. The current study included 7,674 Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) participants, 30 to 74 years of age, between 1976 and 1980. Mortality follow-up through December 31, 1992 was assessed using the National Death Index and Social Security Administration Death Master File. A graded association between higher WBC and higher risk of total cancer mortality was observed [highest versus lowest quartile (relative risk [RR] 2.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-3.23)] after adjusting for age, sex, and race. After further adjustment for smoking, physical activity, body mass index, alcohol intake, education, hematocrit, and diabetes, WBC remained significantly associated (P trend = 0.03) with total cancer mortality [highest versus lowest quartile (RR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.08-2.56)]. In stratified analyses, increased WBC was associated with higher risk of non-lung cancer (P trend = 0.04), but not lung cancer (P trend = 0.18). Among never smokers, a 1 SD increase in WBC (2.2 x 10(9) cells/L) was associated with greater risk of total (RR 1.32; 95% CI, 1.05-1.67) and non-lung (RR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63) cancer mortality. These findings support the hypothesis that inflammation is an independent risk factor for cancer mortality. Additional studies are needed to determine whether circulating levels of inflammatory markers are associated with increased risk of incident cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. terlinge@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15184263

Citation

Erlinger, Thomas P., et al. "WBC Count and the Risk of Cancer Mortality in a National Sample of U.S. Adults: Results From the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mortality Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 13, no. 6, 2004, pp. 1052-6.
Erlinger TP, Muntner P, Helzlsouer KJ. WBC count and the risk of cancer mortality in a national sample of U.S. adults: results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey mortality study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(6):1052-6.
Erlinger, T. P., Muntner, P., & Helzlsouer, K. J. (2004). WBC count and the risk of cancer mortality in a national sample of U.S. adults: results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey mortality study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 13(6), 1052-6.
Erlinger TP, Muntner P, Helzlsouer KJ. WBC Count and the Risk of Cancer Mortality in a National Sample of U.S. Adults: Results From the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mortality Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(6):1052-6. PubMed PMID: 15184263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - WBC count and the risk of cancer mortality in a national sample of U.S. adults: results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey mortality study. AU - Erlinger,Thomas P, AU - Muntner,Paul, AU - Helzlsouer,Kathy J, PY - 2004/6/9/pubmed PY - 2004/9/4/medline PY - 2004/6/9/entrez SP - 1052 EP - 6 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - Inflammation has been shown to be a risk factor for several chronic diseases. Few epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between markers of inflammation and cancer. The current study included 7,674 Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) participants, 30 to 74 years of age, between 1976 and 1980. Mortality follow-up through December 31, 1992 was assessed using the National Death Index and Social Security Administration Death Master File. A graded association between higher WBC and higher risk of total cancer mortality was observed [highest versus lowest quartile (relative risk [RR] 2.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-3.23)] after adjusting for age, sex, and race. After further adjustment for smoking, physical activity, body mass index, alcohol intake, education, hematocrit, and diabetes, WBC remained significantly associated (P trend = 0.03) with total cancer mortality [highest versus lowest quartile (RR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.08-2.56)]. In stratified analyses, increased WBC was associated with higher risk of non-lung cancer (P trend = 0.04), but not lung cancer (P trend = 0.18). Among never smokers, a 1 SD increase in WBC (2.2 x 10(9) cells/L) was associated with greater risk of total (RR 1.32; 95% CI, 1.05-1.67) and non-lung (RR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63) cancer mortality. These findings support the hypothesis that inflammation is an independent risk factor for cancer mortality. Additional studies are needed to determine whether circulating levels of inflammatory markers are associated with increased risk of incident cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15184263/WBC_count_and_the_risk_of_cancer_mortality_in_a_national_sample_of_U_S__adults:_results_from_the_Second_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_mortality_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15184263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -