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Alcohol consumption and periodontal disease. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
J Clin Periodontol. 2004 Jul; 31(7):484-8.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of alcohol consumption on the severity of periodontal disease.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

This cross-sectional study employed 13,198 subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) aged 20 and older who have at least six natural teeth. Alcohol intake was represented both as a continuous variable and dichotomized using 5, 10, 15, and 20 drinks/week as cut-points. Periodontal disease was represented by clinical attachment loss (CAL) and was assessed both as a continuous variable and dichotomized as <1.5 mm and >/=1.5 mm. Independent effect of alcohol on CAL was assessed by weighted multiple linear and logistic regression analyses adjusting simultaneously for the effects of age, gender, race, education, income, smoking, diet, diabetes, gingival bleeding, number of remaining teeth.

RESULTS

There was a significant linear relationship between number of drinks per week and log CAL (p=0.0001). Odds ratios for the risk of attachment loss using 5, 10, 15, and 20 drinks/week as cut-points were 1.22 [1.02-1.47], 1.39 [1.13-1.71], 1.54 [1.22-1.93], and 1.67 [1.25-2.23], respectively.

CONCLUSION

Alcohol consumption may be associated with increased severity of CAL in a dose-dependent fashion. Prospective studies and studies of mechanism are needed to confirm the role of alcohol as a risk factor for periodontal disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral Biology, State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214-3092, USA. mtezal@acsu.buffalo.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15191580

Citation

Tezal, Mine, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Periodontal Disease. the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." Journal of Clinical Periodontology, vol. 31, no. 7, 2004, pp. 484-8.
Tezal M, Grossi SG, Ho AW, et al. Alcohol consumption and periodontal disease. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Clin Periodontol. 2004;31(7):484-8.
Tezal, M., Grossi, S. G., Ho, A. W., & Genco, R. J. (2004). Alcohol consumption and periodontal disease. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 31(7), 484-8.
Tezal M, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Periodontal Disease. the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Clin Periodontol. 2004;31(7):484-8. PubMed PMID: 15191580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and periodontal disease. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Tezal,Mine, AU - Grossi,Sara G, AU - Ho,Alex W, AU - Genco,Robert J, PY - 2004/6/12/pubmed PY - 2004/7/28/medline PY - 2004/6/12/entrez SP - 484 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical periodontology JO - J Clin Periodontol VL - 31 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of alcohol consumption on the severity of periodontal disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study employed 13,198 subjects of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) aged 20 and older who have at least six natural teeth. Alcohol intake was represented both as a continuous variable and dichotomized using 5, 10, 15, and 20 drinks/week as cut-points. Periodontal disease was represented by clinical attachment loss (CAL) and was assessed both as a continuous variable and dichotomized as <1.5 mm and >/=1.5 mm. Independent effect of alcohol on CAL was assessed by weighted multiple linear and logistic regression analyses adjusting simultaneously for the effects of age, gender, race, education, income, smoking, diet, diabetes, gingival bleeding, number of remaining teeth. RESULTS: There was a significant linear relationship between number of drinks per week and log CAL (p=0.0001). Odds ratios for the risk of attachment loss using 5, 10, 15, and 20 drinks/week as cut-points were 1.22 [1.02-1.47], 1.39 [1.13-1.71], 1.54 [1.22-1.93], and 1.67 [1.25-2.23], respectively. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption may be associated with increased severity of CAL in a dose-dependent fashion. Prospective studies and studies of mechanism are needed to confirm the role of alcohol as a risk factor for periodontal disease. SN - 0303-6979 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15191580/Alcohol_consumption_and_periodontal_disease__The_Third_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2004.00503.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -