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SARS in healthcare facilities, Toronto and Taiwan.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 May; 10(5):777-81.EI

Abstract

The healthcare setting was important in the early spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in both Toronto and Taiwan. Healthcare workers, patients, and visitors were at increased risk for infection. Nonetheless, the ability of individual SARS patients to transmit disease was quite variable. Unrecognized SARS case-patients were a primary source of transmission, and early detection and intervention were important to limit spread. Strict adherence to infection control precautions was essential in containing outbreaks. In addition, grouping patients into cohorts and limiting access to SARS patients minimized exposure opportunities. Given the difficulty in implementing several of these measures, control measures were frequently adapted to the acuity of SARS care and level of transmission within facilities. Although these conclusions are based only on a retrospective analysis of events, applying the experiences of Toronto and Taiwan to SARS preparedness planning efforts will likely minimize future transmission within healthcare facilities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. ljm3@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15200808

Citation

McDonald, L Clifford, et al. "SARS in Healthcare Facilities, Toronto and Taiwan." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 10, no. 5, 2004, pp. 777-81.
McDonald LC, Simor AE, Su IJ, et al. SARS in healthcare facilities, Toronto and Taiwan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(5):777-81.
McDonald, L. C., Simor, A. E., Su, I. J., Maloney, S., Ofner, M., Chen, K. T., Lando, J. F., McGeer, A., Lee, M. L., & Jernigan, D. B. (2004). SARS in healthcare facilities, Toronto and Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(5), 777-81.
McDonald LC, et al. SARS in Healthcare Facilities, Toronto and Taiwan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(5):777-81. PubMed PMID: 15200808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - SARS in healthcare facilities, Toronto and Taiwan. AU - McDonald,L Clifford, AU - Simor,Andrew E, AU - Su,Ih-Jen, AU - Maloney,Susan, AU - Ofner,Marianna, AU - Chen,Kow-Tong, AU - Lando,James F, AU - McGeer,Allison, AU - Lee,Min-Ling, AU - Jernigan,Daniel B, PY - 2004/6/18/pubmed PY - 2004/8/21/medline PY - 2004/6/18/entrez SP - 777 EP - 81 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerg Infect Dis VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - The healthcare setting was important in the early spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in both Toronto and Taiwan. Healthcare workers, patients, and visitors were at increased risk for infection. Nonetheless, the ability of individual SARS patients to transmit disease was quite variable. Unrecognized SARS case-patients were a primary source of transmission, and early detection and intervention were important to limit spread. Strict adherence to infection control precautions was essential in containing outbreaks. In addition, grouping patients into cohorts and limiting access to SARS patients minimized exposure opportunities. Given the difficulty in implementing several of these measures, control measures were frequently adapted to the acuity of SARS care and level of transmission within facilities. Although these conclusions are based only on a retrospective analysis of events, applying the experiences of Toronto and Taiwan to SARS preparedness planning efforts will likely minimize future transmission within healthcare facilities. SN - 1080-6040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15200808/SARS_in_healthcare_facilities_Toronto_and_Taiwan_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/15200808/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -