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Effects of prenatal marijuana on response inhibition: an fMRI study of young adults.
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 Jul-Aug; 26(4):533-42.NT

Abstract

The neurophysiological effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on response inhibition were assessed in 18- to 22-year-olds. Thirty-one participants from the Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study (OPPS) performed a blocked design Go/No-Go task while neural activity was imaged with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The OPPS is a longitudinal study that provides a unique body of information collected from each participant over 20 years, including prenatal drug history, detailed cognitive/behavioral performance from infancy to young adulthood, and current and past drug usage. The fMRI results showed that with increased prenatal marijuana exposure, there was a significant increase in neural activity in bilateral prefrontal cortex and right premotor cortex during response inhibition. There was also an attenuation of activity in left cerebellum with increased prenatal exposure to marijuana when challenging the response inhibition neural circuitry. Prenatally exposed offspring had significantly more commission errors than nonexposed participants, but all participants were able to perform the task with more than 85% accuracy. These findings were observed when controlling for present marijuana use and prenatal exposure to nicotine, alcohol and caffeine, and suggest that prenatal marijuana exposure is related to changes in neural activity during response inhibition that last into young adulthood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6. asmith@uottawa.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15203175

Citation

Smith, Andra M., et al. "Effects of Prenatal Marijuana On Response Inhibition: an fMRI Study of Young Adults." Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 26, no. 4, 2004, pp. 533-42.
Smith AM, Fried PA, Hogan MJ, et al. Effects of prenatal marijuana on response inhibition: an fMRI study of young adults. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004;26(4):533-42.
Smith, A. M., Fried, P. A., Hogan, M. J., & Cameron, I. (2004). Effects of prenatal marijuana on response inhibition: an fMRI study of young adults. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 26(4), 533-42.
Smith AM, et al. Effects of Prenatal Marijuana On Response Inhibition: an fMRI Study of Young Adults. Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 Jul-Aug;26(4):533-42. PubMed PMID: 15203175.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of prenatal marijuana on response inhibition: an fMRI study of young adults. AU - Smith,Andra M, AU - Fried,Peter A, AU - Hogan,Matthew J, AU - Cameron,Ian, PY - 2004/02/13/received PY - 2004/04/01/revised PY - 2004/04/07/accepted PY - 2004/6/19/pubmed PY - 2004/8/24/medline PY - 2004/6/19/entrez SP - 533 EP - 42 JF - Neurotoxicology and teratology JO - Neurotoxicol Teratol VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - The neurophysiological effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on response inhibition were assessed in 18- to 22-year-olds. Thirty-one participants from the Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study (OPPS) performed a blocked design Go/No-Go task while neural activity was imaged with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The OPPS is a longitudinal study that provides a unique body of information collected from each participant over 20 years, including prenatal drug history, detailed cognitive/behavioral performance from infancy to young adulthood, and current and past drug usage. The fMRI results showed that with increased prenatal marijuana exposure, there was a significant increase in neural activity in bilateral prefrontal cortex and right premotor cortex during response inhibition. There was also an attenuation of activity in left cerebellum with increased prenatal exposure to marijuana when challenging the response inhibition neural circuitry. Prenatally exposed offspring had significantly more commission errors than nonexposed participants, but all participants were able to perform the task with more than 85% accuracy. These findings were observed when controlling for present marijuana use and prenatal exposure to nicotine, alcohol and caffeine, and suggest that prenatal marijuana exposure is related to changes in neural activity during response inhibition that last into young adulthood. SN - 0892-0362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15203175/Effects_of_prenatal_marijuana_on_response_inhibition:_an_fMRI_study_of_young_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0892036204000662 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -