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Effects of opium addiction on some serum factors in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
Addict Biol 2004; 9(1):53-8AB

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of opium on biochemical parameters in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Twenty-three males and 26 females between 35 and 65 years of age, with NIDDM, addicted to opium, were selected as the case group. Twenty-three males and 26 females with NIDDM and no opium addiction served as controls. Fasting glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins-cholesterol (HDL-c), triglycerides (TGs), sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), iron (Fe(2+)), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum total protein, albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), uric acid and urea were measured in the serum of the two groups. Serum protein electrophoresis was also carried out. Compared to the control group, in addicted males with NIDDM, HbA1c, K(+) and Fe(2+) were higher, and serum total protein, ALT and HDL-c were lower. No significant difference was observed between other factors. Albumin was lower in addicts, but no significant difference was observed between the albumin/globulin ratios. In addicted females with NIDDM, serum total protein, TIBC, ALT and AST were lower compared to non-addicts. Cholesterol tends to be lower in diabetic addicted males, HbA1c in addicted females and uric acid in addicted males was higher compared to non-addicted diabetics. Their differences, however, were not significant. According to our results, smoking opium increases serum glucose and decreases HDL-c, and thus adds to metabolic disorders in NIDDM patients. It also increases potassium and Fe(2) in males and decreases TIBC in females, and could therefore potentially interfere with water and iron metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran. asadi_ka@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15203439

Citation

Karam, Gholamreza Asadi, et al. "Effects of Opium Addiction On some Serum Factors in Addicts With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus." Addiction Biology, vol. 9, no. 1, 2004, pp. 53-8.
Karam GA, Reisi M, Kaseb AA, et al. Effects of opium addiction on some serum factors in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Addict Biol. 2004;9(1):53-8.
Karam, G. A., Reisi, M., Kaseb, A. A., Khaksari, M., Mohammadi, A., & Mahmoodi, M. (2004). Effects of opium addiction on some serum factors in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Addiction Biology, 9(1), pp. 53-8.
Karam GA, et al. Effects of Opium Addiction On some Serum Factors in Addicts With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Addict Biol. 2004;9(1):53-8. PubMed PMID: 15203439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of opium addiction on some serum factors in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. AU - Karam,Gholamreza Asadi, AU - Reisi,Mostafa, AU - Kaseb,Ali Alizadeh, AU - Khaksari,Mohammad, AU - Mohammadi,Abbas, AU - Mahmoodi,Mehdi, PY - 2004/6/19/pubmed PY - 2004/9/8/medline PY - 2004/6/19/entrez SP - 53 EP - 8 JF - Addiction biology JO - Addict Biol VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of this study was to determine the effect of opium on biochemical parameters in addicts with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Twenty-three males and 26 females between 35 and 65 years of age, with NIDDM, addicted to opium, were selected as the case group. Twenty-three males and 26 females with NIDDM and no opium addiction served as controls. Fasting glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins-cholesterol (HDL-c), triglycerides (TGs), sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), iron (Fe(2+)), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum total protein, albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), uric acid and urea were measured in the serum of the two groups. Serum protein electrophoresis was also carried out. Compared to the control group, in addicted males with NIDDM, HbA1c, K(+) and Fe(2+) were higher, and serum total protein, ALT and HDL-c were lower. No significant difference was observed between other factors. Albumin was lower in addicts, but no significant difference was observed between the albumin/globulin ratios. In addicted females with NIDDM, serum total protein, TIBC, ALT and AST were lower compared to non-addicts. Cholesterol tends to be lower in diabetic addicted males, HbA1c in addicted females and uric acid in addicted males was higher compared to non-addicted diabetics. Their differences, however, were not significant. According to our results, smoking opium increases serum glucose and decreases HDL-c, and thus adds to metabolic disorders in NIDDM patients. It also increases potassium and Fe(2) in males and decreases TIBC in females, and could therefore potentially interfere with water and iron metabolism. SN - 1355-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15203439/Effects_of_opium_addiction_on_some_serum_factors_in_addicts_with_non_insulin_dependent_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/13556210410001674095 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -