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Evaluation of strategies for use of acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and adults: a cost-benefit analysis.
Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 01; 39(1):20-8.CI

Abstract

Pertussis is increasingly recognized as a source of infection in adults who then commonly infect young children. Immunity to illness caused by Bordetella pertussis is not long-lived, so optimal control of pertussis may require booster immunizations. In a cost-benefit analysis, we evaluated the benefits of 7 independent strategies for administering a pertussis booster, in the form of a diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, to adolescents and adults. Break-even vaccine costs for each strategy were calculated by dividing costs preventable by vaccine by the number of persons eligible for vaccination. Of these strategies, the most economical would be to immunize adolescents 10-19 years of age, which would prevent 0.7-1.8 million pertussis cases and save 0.6 dollars-1.6 billion dollars over a decade. Although justified by our analysis, routine adult booster vaccinations every decade would be more expensive and more difficult to implement. A recommendation for booster vaccinations every 10 years requires more information about duration of immunity, program costs, compliance, and nonmedical costs associated with pertussis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for Vaccine Research, Research and Education Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502-2502, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15206048

Citation

Purdy, Kenneth W., et al. "Evaluation of Strategies for Use of Acellular Pertussis Vaccine in Adolescents and Adults: a Cost-benefit Analysis." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 39, no. 1, 2004, pp. 20-8.
Purdy KW, Hay JW, Botteman MF, et al. Evaluation of strategies for use of acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and adults: a cost-benefit analysis. Clin Infect Dis. 2004;39(1):20-8.
Purdy, K. W., Hay, J. W., Botteman, M. F., & Ward, J. I. (2004). Evaluation of strategies for use of acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and adults: a cost-benefit analysis. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 39(1), 20-8.
Purdy KW, et al. Evaluation of Strategies for Use of Acellular Pertussis Vaccine in Adolescents and Adults: a Cost-benefit Analysis. Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 1;39(1):20-8. PubMed PMID: 15206048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of strategies for use of acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and adults: a cost-benefit analysis. AU - Purdy,Kenneth W, AU - Hay,Joel W, AU - Botteman,Marc F, AU - Ward,Joel I, Y1 - 2004/06/14/ PY - 2003/11/07/received PY - 2004/01/28/accepted PY - 2004/6/19/pubmed PY - 2004/10/6/medline PY - 2004/6/19/entrez SP - 20 EP - 8 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - Pertussis is increasingly recognized as a source of infection in adults who then commonly infect young children. Immunity to illness caused by Bordetella pertussis is not long-lived, so optimal control of pertussis may require booster immunizations. In a cost-benefit analysis, we evaluated the benefits of 7 independent strategies for administering a pertussis booster, in the form of a diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, to adolescents and adults. Break-even vaccine costs for each strategy were calculated by dividing costs preventable by vaccine by the number of persons eligible for vaccination. Of these strategies, the most economical would be to immunize adolescents 10-19 years of age, which would prevent 0.7-1.8 million pertussis cases and save 0.6 dollars-1.6 billion dollars over a decade. Although justified by our analysis, routine adult booster vaccinations every decade would be more expensive and more difficult to implement. A recommendation for booster vaccinations every 10 years requires more information about duration of immunity, program costs, compliance, and nonmedical costs associated with pertussis. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15206048/Evaluation_of_strategies_for_use_of_acellular_pertussis_vaccine_in_adolescents_and_adults:_a_cost_benefit_analysis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/421091 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -