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Management of hydrocephalus in the patient with myelomeningocele: an argument against third ventriculostomy.
Neurosurg Focus. 2004 Feb 15; 16(2):E4.NF

Abstract

The majority of children with myelomeningocele will have associated hydrocephalus. The management of hydrocephalus can be one of the most trying problems in this patient population. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion will be required in these children for the remainder of their lives. Blockage of the outlets of the fourth ventricle and communication of the fourth ventricle with the central canal provides a mechanism for compensation. The signs and symptoms of CSF diversion malfunction, either shunt or third ventriculostomy, can be quite subtle. The objective indications of these malfunctions are less available after third ventriculostomy than when using mechanical shunting. The ease with which the diagnosis of malfunction can be made becomes the major advantage of mechanical shunting over third ventriculostomy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Neurosurgery of South Texas, PA, San Antonio, Texas, USA. aem@pediatric-neurosurgery.com

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15209487

Citation

Marlin, Arthur E.. "Management of Hydrocephalus in the Patient With Myelomeningocele: an Argument Against Third Ventriculostomy." Neurosurgical Focus, vol. 16, no. 2, 2004, pp. E4.
Marlin AE. Management of hydrocephalus in the patient with myelomeningocele: an argument against third ventriculostomy. Neurosurg Focus. 2004;16(2):E4.
Marlin, A. E. (2004). Management of hydrocephalus in the patient with myelomeningocele: an argument against third ventriculostomy. Neurosurgical Focus, 16(2), E4.
Marlin AE. Management of Hydrocephalus in the Patient With Myelomeningocele: an Argument Against Third Ventriculostomy. Neurosurg Focus. 2004 Feb 15;16(2):E4. PubMed PMID: 15209487.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of hydrocephalus in the patient with myelomeningocele: an argument against third ventriculostomy. A1 - Marlin,Arthur E, Y1 - 2004/02/15/ PY - 2004/6/24/pubmed PY - 2004/9/30/medline PY - 2004/6/24/entrez SP - E4 EP - E4 JF - Neurosurgical focus JO - Neurosurg Focus VL - 16 IS - 2 N2 - The majority of children with myelomeningocele will have associated hydrocephalus. The management of hydrocephalus can be one of the most trying problems in this patient population. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion will be required in these children for the remainder of their lives. Blockage of the outlets of the fourth ventricle and communication of the fourth ventricle with the central canal provides a mechanism for compensation. The signs and symptoms of CSF diversion malfunction, either shunt or third ventriculostomy, can be quite subtle. The objective indications of these malfunctions are less available after third ventriculostomy than when using mechanical shunting. The ease with which the diagnosis of malfunction can be made becomes the major advantage of mechanical shunting over third ventriculostomy. SN - 1092-0684 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15209487/Management_of_hydrocephalus_in_the_patient_with_myelomeningocele:_an_argument_against_third_ventriculostomy_ L2 - https://thejns.org/doi/10.3171/foc.2004.16.2.5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -