Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Usefulness of a program of hospital-supervised physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis.
Pediatr Pulmonol 2004; 38(2):115-8PP

Abstract

Exercise is an important part of normal childhood, but the ability to exercise may be impaired in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Improving exercise performance by training is very attractive. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the effects of a physical aerobic training program, performed in the Children's Hospital and Research Institute "Bambino Gesù" (Rome, Italy) in outpatient CF children, supervised by a physician. Twelve patients (mean forced expiratory flow in 1 sec (FEV1), 71%), age range 12-24 years (16.7 +/- 4.4 years), were enrolled. They performed a maximal exercise stress test on the treadmill (modified Bruce protocol) with breath-by-breath determination of oxygen consumption (VO2) to maximum at end-exercise; we measured time of exercise (TE), maximal heart rate (Hrmax) in beats per minute (bpm), and maximal systolic blood pressure (SBPm) in mmHg. The program consisted of 12 weeks of training twice a week. Each training session consisted of walking or running on the treadmill for 30 min at the speed that allowed the child to attain 60% of the maximal heart rate obtained during a baseline stress test for 4 weeks, 70% in the following 4 weeks, and 80% in the last 4 weeks, under strict medical supervision. HR was continously monitored. There was no change in FEV1 and forced vital capacity after the treatment period. Hrmax and SBPm also remained the same (P = 0.37 and P = 0.25, respectively). There was a significant increase in TE (P < 0.002), VO2, VO2/kg, and pulmonary ventilation (VE) (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). This pilot study showed that a simple training program improves short-term cardiopulmonary fitness in children with CF. Further studies with a larger sample and for a more prolonged time are necessary to assess if sport can have a long-term effect on lung function or survival in CF patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Medicine, Children's Hospital and Research Institute Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy. turchetta@opbg.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Studies
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15211693

Citation

Turchetta, Attilio, et al. "Usefulness of a Program of Hospital-supervised Physical Training in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 38, no. 2, 2004, pp. 115-8.
Turchetta A, Salerno T, Lucidi V, et al. Usefulness of a program of hospital-supervised physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004;38(2):115-8.
Turchetta, A., Salerno, T., Lucidi, V., Libera, F., Cutrera, R., & Bush, A. (2004). Usefulness of a program of hospital-supervised physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis. Pediatric Pulmonology, 38(2), pp. 115-8.
Turchetta A, et al. Usefulness of a Program of Hospital-supervised Physical Training in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004;38(2):115-8. PubMed PMID: 15211693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Usefulness of a program of hospital-supervised physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis. AU - Turchetta,Attilio, AU - Salerno,Teresa, AU - Lucidi,Vincenzina, AU - Libera,Flavia, AU - Cutrera,Renato, AU - Bush,Andrew, PY - 2004/6/24/pubmed PY - 2005/2/18/medline PY - 2004/6/24/entrez SP - 115 EP - 8 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr. Pulmonol. VL - 38 IS - 2 N2 - Exercise is an important part of normal childhood, but the ability to exercise may be impaired in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Improving exercise performance by training is very attractive. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the effects of a physical aerobic training program, performed in the Children's Hospital and Research Institute "Bambino Gesù" (Rome, Italy) in outpatient CF children, supervised by a physician. Twelve patients (mean forced expiratory flow in 1 sec (FEV1), 71%), age range 12-24 years (16.7 +/- 4.4 years), were enrolled. They performed a maximal exercise stress test on the treadmill (modified Bruce protocol) with breath-by-breath determination of oxygen consumption (VO2) to maximum at end-exercise; we measured time of exercise (TE), maximal heart rate (Hrmax) in beats per minute (bpm), and maximal systolic blood pressure (SBPm) in mmHg. The program consisted of 12 weeks of training twice a week. Each training session consisted of walking or running on the treadmill for 30 min at the speed that allowed the child to attain 60% of the maximal heart rate obtained during a baseline stress test for 4 weeks, 70% in the following 4 weeks, and 80% in the last 4 weeks, under strict medical supervision. HR was continously monitored. There was no change in FEV1 and forced vital capacity after the treatment period. Hrmax and SBPm also remained the same (P = 0.37 and P = 0.25, respectively). There was a significant increase in TE (P < 0.002), VO2, VO2/kg, and pulmonary ventilation (VE) (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). This pilot study showed that a simple training program improves short-term cardiopulmonary fitness in children with CF. Further studies with a larger sample and for a more prolonged time are necessary to assess if sport can have a long-term effect on lung function or survival in CF patients. SN - 8755-6863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15211693/Usefulness_of_a_program_of_hospital_supervised_physical_training_in_patients_with_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.20073 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -