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Frequent and occasional physical activity in the elderly: a 12-year follow-up study of mortality.
Am J Prev Med 2004; 27(1):22-7AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The positive health effects of physical activity are well known. However, there are few studies of the association between different levels of physical activity and all-cause mortality among elderly people.

METHODS

A national random sample of 3206 women and men aged >/=65 were interviewed in 1988 and 1989 and followed until December 31, 2000, for all-cause mortality. Cox regression was used to analyze the association between five different levels of physical activity and all-cause mortality, after adjustment for gender, age, education, smoking habits, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and self-rated health. All analyses were conducted in 2003.

RESULTS

For elderly people who were physically active occasionally, the risk of all-cause mortality was 28% lower than for those who were physically inactive (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72; confidence interval [CI]=0.64-0.81), after adjustment for all explanatory variables. For those who were physically active once a week, the risk of all-cause mortality was 40% lower than for those who were physically inactive (HR=0.60; CI=0.50-0.71). For those who were physically active more frequently, the reduction in all-cause mortality risk was about the same as for those who were physically active once a week. Diabetes, hypertension, and daily smoking were, as expected, significant risk factors for all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Physical activity, even occasionally, decreases the risk of all-cause mortality among elderly people. Preventive resources among the elderly should include moderate exercise such as walking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Karolinska Institutet, Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. Kristina.Sundquist@klinvet.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15212771

Citation

Sundquist, Kristina, et al. "Frequent and Occasional Physical Activity in the Elderly: a 12-year Follow-up Study of Mortality." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 27, no. 1, 2004, pp. 22-7.
Sundquist K, Qvist J, Sundquist J, et al. Frequent and occasional physical activity in the elderly: a 12-year follow-up study of mortality. Am J Prev Med. 2004;27(1):22-7.
Sundquist, K., Qvist, J., Sundquist, J., & Johansson, S. E. (2004). Frequent and occasional physical activity in the elderly: a 12-year follow-up study of mortality. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27(1), pp. 22-7.
Sundquist K, et al. Frequent and Occasional Physical Activity in the Elderly: a 12-year Follow-up Study of Mortality. Am J Prev Med. 2004;27(1):22-7. PubMed PMID: 15212771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Frequent and occasional physical activity in the elderly: a 12-year follow-up study of mortality. AU - Sundquist,Kristina, AU - Qvist,Jan, AU - Sundquist,Jan, AU - Johansson,Sven-Erik, PY - 2004/6/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/17/medline PY - 2004/6/24/entrez SP - 22 EP - 7 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The positive health effects of physical activity are well known. However, there are few studies of the association between different levels of physical activity and all-cause mortality among elderly people. METHODS: A national random sample of 3206 women and men aged >/=65 were interviewed in 1988 and 1989 and followed until December 31, 2000, for all-cause mortality. Cox regression was used to analyze the association between five different levels of physical activity and all-cause mortality, after adjustment for gender, age, education, smoking habits, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and self-rated health. All analyses were conducted in 2003. RESULTS: For elderly people who were physically active occasionally, the risk of all-cause mortality was 28% lower than for those who were physically inactive (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72; confidence interval [CI]=0.64-0.81), after adjustment for all explanatory variables. For those who were physically active once a week, the risk of all-cause mortality was 40% lower than for those who were physically inactive (HR=0.60; CI=0.50-0.71). For those who were physically active more frequently, the reduction in all-cause mortality risk was about the same as for those who were physically active once a week. Diabetes, hypertension, and daily smoking were, as expected, significant risk factors for all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity, even occasionally, decreases the risk of all-cause mortality among elderly people. Preventive resources among the elderly should include moderate exercise such as walking. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15212771/Frequent_and_occasional_physical_activity_in_the_elderly:_a_12_year_follow_up_study_of_mortality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749379704000558 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -