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Effects of metformin on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome.
J Reprod Med. 2004 May; 49(5):361-7.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effects of 6 months of metformin therapy on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to evaluate those parameters in responders and nonresponders to identify the subjects who respond to an insulin sensitizer in PCOS.

STUDY DESIGN

Sixty-six diagnosed PCOS patients were recruited. Baseline characteristics (menstrual history, hirsutism scoring, acne grading, body mass index [BMI], serum luteinizing hormone and follicule-stimulating hormone [LH/FSH] ratio, testosterone,fasting insulin and glucose/insulin index) were assessed initially and 6 months after metformin therapy. Three groups were constructed on the basis of menstrual symptoms: oligomenorrhea (group I), amenorrhea (group II) and hypomenorrhea (group III). Responders were those who had improvements in menstrual pattern or conceived. Response was compared in 3 groups, and biochemical parameters were compared in responders and nonresponders.

RESULTS

There were 44 (66.6%) oligomenorrheic, 17 (25.7%) amenorrheic and 5 (7.5%) hypomenorrheic cases and 31 (46.5%) infertile women. In total, 85.7% responded to treatment; the rest (14.3%) were nonresponders. Among responders, 62.29% achieved regular periods, 22.95% experienced improvements in their menstrual abnormalities, and 13% conceived. Overall, a significant reduction occurred in BMI (P =.04), mean testosterone (P = .03) and mean fasting insulin levels (P = .01), but no significant improvement was observed in hirsutism, acne, LH/FSH ratio or glucose/insulin index. A total of 9.75%, 18.75% and 30% did not respond in the oligomenorrheic, amenorrheic and hypomenorrheic groups, respectively (P = .04). Testosterone and insulin were reduced significantly in responders (P = .05 and .01, respectively) but not in nonresponders (P = .26 and .73). An initial high LH/FSH ratio and lower testosterone levels were associated with a better response.

CONCLUSION

Six months of metformin therapy improved menstrual cyclicity and fertility in women with PCOS. It resulted in a decline in testosterone and insulin levels. Oligomenorrheic patients with an increased LH/FSH ratio and lower testosterone levels responded better.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15214709

Citation

Kriplani, Alka, and Nutan Agarwal. "Effects of Metformin On Clinical and Biochemical Parameters in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, vol. 49, no. 5, 2004, pp. 361-7.
Kriplani A, Agarwal N. Effects of metformin on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome. J Reprod Med. 2004;49(5):361-7.
Kriplani, A., & Agarwal, N. (2004). Effects of metformin on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome. The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, 49(5), 361-7.
Kriplani A, Agarwal N. Effects of Metformin On Clinical and Biochemical Parameters in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. J Reprod Med. 2004;49(5):361-7. PubMed PMID: 15214709.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of metformin on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Kriplani,Alka, AU - Agarwal,Nutan, PY - 2004/6/25/pubmed PY - 2004/9/1/medline PY - 2004/6/25/entrez SP - 361 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of reproductive medicine JO - J Reprod Med VL - 49 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of 6 months of metformin therapy on clinical and biochemical parameters in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to evaluate those parameters in responders and nonresponders to identify the subjects who respond to an insulin sensitizer in PCOS. STUDY DESIGN: Sixty-six diagnosed PCOS patients were recruited. Baseline characteristics (menstrual history, hirsutism scoring, acne grading, body mass index [BMI], serum luteinizing hormone and follicule-stimulating hormone [LH/FSH] ratio, testosterone,fasting insulin and glucose/insulin index) were assessed initially and 6 months after metformin therapy. Three groups were constructed on the basis of menstrual symptoms: oligomenorrhea (group I), amenorrhea (group II) and hypomenorrhea (group III). Responders were those who had improvements in menstrual pattern or conceived. Response was compared in 3 groups, and biochemical parameters were compared in responders and nonresponders. RESULTS: There were 44 (66.6%) oligomenorrheic, 17 (25.7%) amenorrheic and 5 (7.5%) hypomenorrheic cases and 31 (46.5%) infertile women. In total, 85.7% responded to treatment; the rest (14.3%) were nonresponders. Among responders, 62.29% achieved regular periods, 22.95% experienced improvements in their menstrual abnormalities, and 13% conceived. Overall, a significant reduction occurred in BMI (P =.04), mean testosterone (P = .03) and mean fasting insulin levels (P = .01), but no significant improvement was observed in hirsutism, acne, LH/FSH ratio or glucose/insulin index. A total of 9.75%, 18.75% and 30% did not respond in the oligomenorrheic, amenorrheic and hypomenorrheic groups, respectively (P = .04). Testosterone and insulin were reduced significantly in responders (P = .05 and .01, respectively) but not in nonresponders (P = .26 and .73). An initial high LH/FSH ratio and lower testosterone levels were associated with a better response. CONCLUSION: Six months of metformin therapy improved menstrual cyclicity and fertility in women with PCOS. It resulted in a decline in testosterone and insulin levels. Oligomenorrheic patients with an increased LH/FSH ratio and lower testosterone levels responded better. SN - 0024-7758 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15214709/Effects_of_metformin_on_clinical_and_biochemical_parameters_in_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabetesmedicines.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -