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Immunohistochemical localization of the epithelial sodium channel in the rat inner ear.
Hear Res. 2004 Jul; 193(1-2):1-8.HR

Abstract

Endolymph in membranous labyrinth is a K+-rich and Na+-poor fluid, and perilymph is conversely Na+-rich and K+-poor. Electrolyte transport between endolymph and perilymph is important for regulation of volume and osmotic pressure of the labyrinth. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a good candidate protein for Na+ transport in the tight epithelia, which has been well demonstrated in other tissues such as kidney, colon and lung. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cellular localization of ENaC subunits in the rat inner ear immunohistochemically with the specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies against the rat alpha-, beta- and gamma-ENaC. All three subunits of ENaC were extensively labeled in the cochlea including the stria vascularis, spiral ligament, organ of Corti, spiral limbus, Reissner's membrane and spiral ganglion, and in the vestibule including the sensory epithelia and stroma cells of the macula utriculi, macula sacculi and ampullary crest. In conclusion, our results suggest that functional ENaC in the labyrinth may work in concert with other Na+ and K+ transport molecules to regulate endolymph and to maintain homeostasis in the inner ear.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology and Head-Neck Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Branch Road, Chongqing 400042, PR China. zhongsx@online.cq.cnNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15219314

Citation

Zhong, Shi-Xun, and Zhao-Hua Liu. "Immunohistochemical Localization of the Epithelial Sodium Channel in the Rat Inner Ear." Hearing Research, vol. 193, no. 1-2, 2004, pp. 1-8.
Zhong SX, Liu ZH. Immunohistochemical localization of the epithelial sodium channel in the rat inner ear. Hear Res. 2004;193(1-2):1-8.
Zhong, S. X., & Liu, Z. H. (2004). Immunohistochemical localization of the epithelial sodium channel in the rat inner ear. Hearing Research, 193(1-2), 1-8.
Zhong SX, Liu ZH. Immunohistochemical Localization of the Epithelial Sodium Channel in the Rat Inner Ear. Hear Res. 2004;193(1-2):1-8. PubMed PMID: 15219314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immunohistochemical localization of the epithelial sodium channel in the rat inner ear. AU - Zhong,Shi-Xun, AU - Liu,Zhao-Hua, PY - 2003/04/09/received PY - 2004/03/01/accepted PY - 2004/6/29/pubmed PY - 2005/1/14/medline PY - 2004/6/29/entrez SP - 1 EP - 8 JF - Hearing research JO - Hear. Res. VL - 193 IS - 1-2 N2 - Endolymph in membranous labyrinth is a K+-rich and Na+-poor fluid, and perilymph is conversely Na+-rich and K+-poor. Electrolyte transport between endolymph and perilymph is important for regulation of volume and osmotic pressure of the labyrinth. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a good candidate protein for Na+ transport in the tight epithelia, which has been well demonstrated in other tissues such as kidney, colon and lung. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cellular localization of ENaC subunits in the rat inner ear immunohistochemically with the specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies against the rat alpha-, beta- and gamma-ENaC. All three subunits of ENaC were extensively labeled in the cochlea including the stria vascularis, spiral ligament, organ of Corti, spiral limbus, Reissner's membrane and spiral ganglion, and in the vestibule including the sensory epithelia and stroma cells of the macula utriculi, macula sacculi and ampullary crest. In conclusion, our results suggest that functional ENaC in the labyrinth may work in concert with other Na+ and K+ transport molecules to regulate endolymph and to maintain homeostasis in the inner ear. SN - 0378-5955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15219314/Immunohistochemical_localization_of_the_epithelial_sodium_channel_in_the_rat_inner_ear_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378595504000838 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -