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Effects of prenatal betamethasone exposure on regulation of stress physiology in healthy premature infants.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004 Sep; 29(8):1028-36.P

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of prenatal exposure to betamethasone, a corticosteroid, on postnatal stress regulation, particularly activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Effects were assessed by measuring salivary cortisol production at baseline and in response to two potentially stressful events, a heel-stick blood draw and a physical exam, in infants born at 33-34 weeks gestation. Subjects included 9 infants with antenatal betamethasone treatment (2 doses of 12 mg of betamethasone administered intramuscularly to the mother twelve hours apart) and 9 infants without such treatment. Testing took place 3-6 days after delivery. Measures of behavioral distress confirmed that both events were stressful to these premature infants. Infants with betamethasone exposure, however, failed to exhibit increases in cortisol to either stressor. In contrast, infants without betamethasone exposure displayed elevated cortisol to the heel-stick blood draw but not the physical exam. These findings suggest that antenatal corticosteroids suppress infants' HPA response to a stressor typically encountered in a neonatal intensive care situation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California Irvine, City Tower, 333 City Boulevard West, Orange, CA 92868, USA. edavis@uci.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15219654

Citation

Davis, Elysia Poggi, et al. "Effects of Prenatal Betamethasone Exposure On Regulation of Stress Physiology in Healthy Premature Infants." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 29, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1028-36.
Davis EP, Townsend EL, Gunnar MR, et al. Effects of prenatal betamethasone exposure on regulation of stress physiology in healthy premature infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1028-36.
Davis, E. P., Townsend, E. L., Gunnar, M. R., Georgieff, M. K., Guiang, S. F., Ciffuentes, R. F., & Lussky, R. C. (2004). Effects of prenatal betamethasone exposure on regulation of stress physiology in healthy premature infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 29(8), 1028-36.
Davis EP, et al. Effects of Prenatal Betamethasone Exposure On Regulation of Stress Physiology in Healthy Premature Infants. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1028-36. PubMed PMID: 15219654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of prenatal betamethasone exposure on regulation of stress physiology in healthy premature infants. AU - Davis,Elysia Poggi, AU - Townsend,Elise L, AU - Gunnar,Megan R, AU - Georgieff,Michael K, AU - Guiang,Sixto F, AU - Ciffuentes,Raul F, AU - Lussky,Richard C, PY - 2002/10/18/received PY - 2003/09/04/revised PY - 2003/10/20/accepted PY - 2004/6/29/pubmed PY - 2004/10/20/medline PY - 2004/6/29/entrez SP - 1028 EP - 36 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 29 IS - 8 N2 - The objective of this study was to examine the effects of prenatal exposure to betamethasone, a corticosteroid, on postnatal stress regulation, particularly activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Effects were assessed by measuring salivary cortisol production at baseline and in response to two potentially stressful events, a heel-stick blood draw and a physical exam, in infants born at 33-34 weeks gestation. Subjects included 9 infants with antenatal betamethasone treatment (2 doses of 12 mg of betamethasone administered intramuscularly to the mother twelve hours apart) and 9 infants without such treatment. Testing took place 3-6 days after delivery. Measures of behavioral distress confirmed that both events were stressful to these premature infants. Infants with betamethasone exposure, however, failed to exhibit increases in cortisol to either stressor. In contrast, infants without betamethasone exposure displayed elevated cortisol to the heel-stick blood draw but not the physical exam. These findings suggest that antenatal corticosteroids suppress infants' HPA response to a stressor typically encountered in a neonatal intensive care situation. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15219654/Effects_of_prenatal_betamethasone_exposure_on_regulation_of_stress_physiology_in_healthy_premature_infants_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -