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Dietary lignan intakes and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer.
Int J Cancer 2004; 111(3):440-3IJ

Abstract

Lignans are plant compounds metabolized in the mammalian gut to produce the phytoestrogens enterolactone and enterodiol. Because estrogens have been linked to breast cancer etiology, lignans could affect breast cancer risk through modulation of endogenous estrogen metabolism or competitive inhibition with estrogen receptors. We examined breast cancer risk and dietary lignan intake in a population-based case-control study of 1,122 women with primary, incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer and 2,036 controls frequency matched to cases on age and county of residence as part of the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study. Diet was assessed with a self-administered 104-item food frequency questionnaire and other relevant data were collected by detailed in-person interviews. Lignans were expressed as the sum of the dietary precursors secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, total energy and other breast cancer risk factors. Premenopausal women in the highest quartile of dietary lignan intake had reduced breast cancer risk (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.44-0.98). No association was observed between lignan intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer. Our results suggest that dietary lignans may be important in the etiology of breast cancer, particularly among premenopausal women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA. susan.mccann@roswellpark.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15221974

Citation

McCann, Susan E., et al. "Dietary Lignan Intakes and Risk of Pre- and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 111, no. 3, 2004, pp. 440-3.
McCann SE, Muti P, Vito D, et al. Dietary lignan intakes and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. Int J Cancer. 2004;111(3):440-3.
McCann, S. E., Muti, P., Vito, D., Edge, S. B., Trevisan, M., & Freudenheim, J. L. (2004). Dietary lignan intakes and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. International Journal of Cancer, 111(3), pp. 440-3.
McCann SE, et al. Dietary Lignan Intakes and Risk of Pre- and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer. Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):440-3. PubMed PMID: 15221974.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary lignan intakes and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. AU - McCann,Susan E, AU - Muti,Paola, AU - Vito,Dominica, AU - Edge,Stephen B, AU - Trevisan,Maurizio, AU - Freudenheim,Jo L, PY - 2004/6/29/pubmed PY - 2004/8/28/medline PY - 2004/6/29/entrez SP - 440 EP - 3 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 111 IS - 3 N2 - Lignans are plant compounds metabolized in the mammalian gut to produce the phytoestrogens enterolactone and enterodiol. Because estrogens have been linked to breast cancer etiology, lignans could affect breast cancer risk through modulation of endogenous estrogen metabolism or competitive inhibition with estrogen receptors. We examined breast cancer risk and dietary lignan intake in a population-based case-control study of 1,122 women with primary, incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer and 2,036 controls frequency matched to cases on age and county of residence as part of the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study. Diet was assessed with a self-administered 104-item food frequency questionnaire and other relevant data were collected by detailed in-person interviews. Lignans were expressed as the sum of the dietary precursors secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, total energy and other breast cancer risk factors. Premenopausal women in the highest quartile of dietary lignan intake had reduced breast cancer risk (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.44-0.98). No association was observed between lignan intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer. Our results suggest that dietary lignans may be important in the etiology of breast cancer, particularly among premenopausal women. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15221974/Dietary_lignan_intakes_and_risk_of_pre__and_postmenopausal_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.20262 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -