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Effects of Nigella sativa on oxidative stress and beta-cell damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.
Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol. 2004 Jul; 279(1):685-91.AR

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effects of Nigella sativa L. (NS) against beta-cell damage from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. STZ was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 50 mg/kg to induce diabetes. NS (0.2 ml/kg/day, i.p.) was injected for 3 days prior to STZ administration, and these injections were continued throughout the 4-week study. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). To assess changes in the cellular antioxidant defense system, we measured the activities of antioxidant enzymes (such as glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT)) in pancreatic homogenates. We also measured serum nitric oxide (NO) and erythrocyte and pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, a marker of lipid peroxidation, to determine whether there is an imbalance between oxidant and antioxidant status. Pancreatic beta-cells were examined by immunohistochemical methods. STZ induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and serum NO concentrations, and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity. NS treatment has been shown to provide a protective effect by decreasing lipid peroxidation and serum NO, and increasing antioxidant enzyme activity. Islet cell degeneration and weak insulin immunohistochemical staining was observed in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Increased intensity of staining for insulin, and preservation of beta-cell numbers were apparent in the NS-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that NS treatment exerts a therapeutic protective effect in diabetes by decreasing oxidative stress and preserving pancreatic beta-cell integrity. Consequently, NS may be clinically useful for protecting beta-cells against oxidative stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak, Turkey. mehmetkanter65@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15224410

Citation

Kanter, Mehmet, et al. "Effects of Nigella Sativa On Oxidative Stress and Beta-cell Damage in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats." The Anatomical Record. Part A, Discoveries in Molecular, Cellular, and Evolutionary Biology, vol. 279, no. 1, 2004, pp. 685-91.
Kanter M, Coskun O, Korkmaz A, et al. Effects of Nigella sativa on oxidative stress and beta-cell damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol. 2004;279(1):685-91.
Kanter, M., Coskun, O., Korkmaz, A., & Oter, S. (2004). Effects of Nigella sativa on oxidative stress and beta-cell damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The Anatomical Record. Part A, Discoveries in Molecular, Cellular, and Evolutionary Biology, 279(1), 685-91.
Kanter M, et al. Effects of Nigella Sativa On Oxidative Stress and Beta-cell Damage in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats. Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol. 2004;279(1):685-91. PubMed PMID: 15224410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Nigella sativa on oxidative stress and beta-cell damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. AU - Kanter,Mehmet, AU - Coskun,Omer, AU - Korkmaz,Ahmet, AU - Oter,Sukru, PY - 2004/6/30/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/6/30/entrez SP - 685 EP - 91 JF - The anatomical record. Part A, Discoveries in molecular, cellular, and evolutionary biology JO - Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol VL - 279 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effects of Nigella sativa L. (NS) against beta-cell damage from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. STZ was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 50 mg/kg to induce diabetes. NS (0.2 ml/kg/day, i.p.) was injected for 3 days prior to STZ administration, and these injections were continued throughout the 4-week study. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). To assess changes in the cellular antioxidant defense system, we measured the activities of antioxidant enzymes (such as glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT)) in pancreatic homogenates. We also measured serum nitric oxide (NO) and erythrocyte and pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, a marker of lipid peroxidation, to determine whether there is an imbalance between oxidant and antioxidant status. Pancreatic beta-cells were examined by immunohistochemical methods. STZ induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and serum NO concentrations, and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity. NS treatment has been shown to provide a protective effect by decreasing lipid peroxidation and serum NO, and increasing antioxidant enzyme activity. Islet cell degeneration and weak insulin immunohistochemical staining was observed in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Increased intensity of staining for insulin, and preservation of beta-cell numbers were apparent in the NS-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that NS treatment exerts a therapeutic protective effect in diabetes by decreasing oxidative stress and preserving pancreatic beta-cell integrity. Consequently, NS may be clinically useful for protecting beta-cells against oxidative stress. SN - 1552-4884 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15224410/Effects_of_Nigella_sativa_on_oxidative_stress_and_beta_cell_damage_in_streptozotocin_induced_diabetic_rats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.a.20056 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -