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Burden of medical illness in women with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder.
Arch Intern Med. 2004 Jun 28; 164(12):1306-12.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are important women's health issues. Depression is known to be associated with poor physical health; however, associations between physical health and PTSD, a common comorbidity of depression, have received less attention.

OBJECTIVES

To examine number of medical symptoms and physical health status in women with PTSD across age strata and benchmark them against those of women with depression alone or with neither depression nor PTSD.

METHODS

A random sample of Veterans Health Administration enrollees received a mailed survey in 1999-2000 (response rate, 63%). The 30 865 women respondents were categorized according to whether a health care provider had ever told them that they had PTSD, depression (without PTSD), or neither. Outcomes were self-reported medical conditions and physical health status measured with the Veterans SF-36 instrument, a version of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) modified for use in veteran populations.

RESULTS

Across age strata, women with PTSD (n = 4348) had more medical conditions and worse physical health status (physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain, and energy/vitality scales from the Veterans SF-36) than women with depression alone (n = 7580) or neither (n = 18 937). In age-adjusted analyses, the Physical Component Summary score was on average 3.4 points lower in women with depression alone and 6.3 points lower in women with PTSD than in women with neither (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with a greater burden of medical illness than is seen with depression alone. The presence of PTSD may account for an important component of the excess medical morbidity and functional status limitations seen in women with depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Care Evaluation, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, Calif, USA. sfrayne@stanford.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15226164

Citation

Frayne, Susan M., et al. "Burden of Medical Illness in Women With Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 164, no. 12, 2004, pp. 1306-12.
Frayne SM, Seaver MR, Loveland S, et al. Burden of medical illness in women with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(12):1306-12.
Frayne, S. M., Seaver, M. R., Loveland, S., Christiansen, C. L., Spiro, A., Parker, V. A., & Skinner, K. M. (2004). Burden of medical illness in women with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Archives of Internal Medicine, 164(12), 1306-12.
Frayne SM, et al. Burden of Medical Illness in Women With Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Jun 28;164(12):1306-12. PubMed PMID: 15226164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Burden of medical illness in women with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. AU - Frayne,Susan M, AU - Seaver,Margaret R, AU - Loveland,Susan, AU - Christiansen,Cindy L, AU - Spiro,Avron,3rd AU - Parker,Victoria A, AU - Skinner,Katherine M, PY - 2004/7/1/pubmed PY - 2004/8/6/medline PY - 2004/7/1/entrez SP - 1306 EP - 12 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 164 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are important women's health issues. Depression is known to be associated with poor physical health; however, associations between physical health and PTSD, a common comorbidity of depression, have received less attention. OBJECTIVES: To examine number of medical symptoms and physical health status in women with PTSD across age strata and benchmark them against those of women with depression alone or with neither depression nor PTSD. METHODS: A random sample of Veterans Health Administration enrollees received a mailed survey in 1999-2000 (response rate, 63%). The 30 865 women respondents were categorized according to whether a health care provider had ever told them that they had PTSD, depression (without PTSD), or neither. Outcomes were self-reported medical conditions and physical health status measured with the Veterans SF-36 instrument, a version of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) modified for use in veteran populations. RESULTS: Across age strata, women with PTSD (n = 4348) had more medical conditions and worse physical health status (physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain, and energy/vitality scales from the Veterans SF-36) than women with depression alone (n = 7580) or neither (n = 18 937). In age-adjusted analyses, the Physical Component Summary score was on average 3.4 points lower in women with depression alone and 6.3 points lower in women with PTSD than in women with neither (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with a greater burden of medical illness than is seen with depression alone. The presence of PTSD may account for an important component of the excess medical morbidity and functional status limitations seen in women with depression. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15226164/Burden_of_medical_illness_in_women_with_depression_and_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.164.12.1306 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -