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Vitamin A status, hospitalizations, and other outcomes in young children with sickle cell disease.
J Pediatr 2004; 145(1):99-106JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the relation of serum vitamin A status to growth, nutritional and hematologic status, and to the number of hospitalizations in children with sickle cell disease-SS (homozygous for the S allele, SCD-SS).

STUDY DESIGN

Children (2-9.9 years of age) with SCD-SS were assessed for serum retinol, hemoglobin, hematocrit, reticulocyte count, height, weight, body mass index, and recalled dietary intake. Vitamin A status was defined on the basis of serum retinol concentration as suboptimal (<30 microg/dL) and normal (> or =30 microg/dL). Hospitalizations were determined for 1 year after vitamin A assessment.

RESULTS

Mean serum retinol was 26.7 +/- 6.8 microg/dL in 66 subjects (39 girls) and was suboptimal in 66% of children. Compared with those with normal status, children with suboptimal vitamin A had significantly lower body mass index z score (-0.7 +/- 1.0 vs -0.1 +/- 0.6) and hemoglobin (7.9 +/- 1.1 vs 8.5 +/- 1.1), and hematocrit (23.3 +/- 3.0 vs 25.1 +/- 3.8) and significantly more hospitalizations (2.8 +/- 2.0 vs 0.7 +/- 0.8). After adjusting for age and sex, suboptimal vitamin A status was associated with a 10-fold increased risk for hospitalization (OR, 10.5; 95% CI, 2.3, 48.6) and with increased pain (OR,5.3; 95% CI, 1.3, 21.6) and fever episodes (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7, 24.9) requiring hospitalization.

CONCLUSIONS

Suboptimal vitamin A status was prevalent in US children with SCD-SS and was associated with increased hospitalizations and poor growth and hematologic status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 19104, USA. schall@email.chop.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15238915

Citation

Schall, Joan I., et al. "Vitamin a Status, Hospitalizations, and Other Outcomes in Young Children With Sickle Cell Disease." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 145, no. 1, 2004, pp. 99-106.
Schall JI, Zemel BS, Kawchak DA, et al. Vitamin A status, hospitalizations, and other outcomes in young children with sickle cell disease. J Pediatr. 2004;145(1):99-106.
Schall, J. I., Zemel, B. S., Kawchak, D. A., Ohene-Frempong, K., & Stallings, V. A. (2004). Vitamin A status, hospitalizations, and other outcomes in young children with sickle cell disease. The Journal of Pediatrics, 145(1), pp. 99-106.
Schall JI, et al. Vitamin a Status, Hospitalizations, and Other Outcomes in Young Children With Sickle Cell Disease. J Pediatr. 2004;145(1):99-106. PubMed PMID: 15238915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin A status, hospitalizations, and other outcomes in young children with sickle cell disease. AU - Schall,Joan I, AU - Zemel,Babette S, AU - Kawchak,Deborah A, AU - Ohene-Frempong,Kwaku, AU - Stallings,Virginia A, PY - 2004/7/9/pubmed PY - 2004/9/3/medline PY - 2004/7/9/entrez SP - 99 EP - 106 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J. Pediatr. VL - 145 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the relation of serum vitamin A status to growth, nutritional and hematologic status, and to the number of hospitalizations in children with sickle cell disease-SS (homozygous for the S allele, SCD-SS). STUDY DESIGN: Children (2-9.9 years of age) with SCD-SS were assessed for serum retinol, hemoglobin, hematocrit, reticulocyte count, height, weight, body mass index, and recalled dietary intake. Vitamin A status was defined on the basis of serum retinol concentration as suboptimal (<30 microg/dL) and normal (> or =30 microg/dL). Hospitalizations were determined for 1 year after vitamin A assessment. RESULTS: Mean serum retinol was 26.7 +/- 6.8 microg/dL in 66 subjects (39 girls) and was suboptimal in 66% of children. Compared with those with normal status, children with suboptimal vitamin A had significantly lower body mass index z score (-0.7 +/- 1.0 vs -0.1 +/- 0.6) and hemoglobin (7.9 +/- 1.1 vs 8.5 +/- 1.1), and hematocrit (23.3 +/- 3.0 vs 25.1 +/- 3.8) and significantly more hospitalizations (2.8 +/- 2.0 vs 0.7 +/- 0.8). After adjusting for age and sex, suboptimal vitamin A status was associated with a 10-fold increased risk for hospitalization (OR, 10.5; 95% CI, 2.3, 48.6) and with increased pain (OR,5.3; 95% CI, 1.3, 21.6) and fever episodes (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7, 24.9) requiring hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal vitamin A status was prevalent in US children with SCD-SS and was associated with increased hospitalizations and poor growth and hematologic status. SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15238915/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(04)00264-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -