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Sources of dietary iodine: bread, cows' milk, and infant formula in the Boston area.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004; 89(7):3421-4JC

Abstract

Dietary iodine is essential for thyroid hormone production. Although U.S. dietary iodine is generally adequate, some groups, especially women of childbearing age, are at risk for mild iodine deficiency. Children's average urinary iodine is higher than that of adults. U.S. dietary iodine sources have not been assessed recently. A survey of iodine content in 20 brands of bread, 18 brands of cows' milk, and eight infant formulae was performed between 2001 and 2002. Three bread varieties contained more than 300 microg iodine per slice. Iodine content in other brands was far lower (mean +/- sd, 10.1 +/- 13.2 microg iodine/slice). All cows' milk samples had at least 88 microg iodine/250 ml, ranging from 88-168 microg (116.0 +/- 22.1 microg/250 ml). Infant formulae values ranged from 16.2 to 56.8 microg iodine/5 oz (23.5 +/- 13.78 microg/5 oz). The public should be aware of the need for adequate dietary iodine intake and should be aware that ingredient lists do not reflect the iodine content of foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 88 East Newton Street, Evans 201, Boston, MA 02118, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15240625

Citation

Pearce, Elizabeth N., et al. "Sources of Dietary Iodine: Bread, Cows' Milk, and Infant Formula in the Boston Area." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 89, no. 7, 2004, pp. 3421-4.
Pearce EN, Pino S, He X, et al. Sources of dietary iodine: bread, cows' milk, and infant formula in the Boston area. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004;89(7):3421-4.
Pearce, E. N., Pino, S., He, X., Bazrafshan, H. R., Lee, S. L., & Braverman, L. E. (2004). Sources of dietary iodine: bread, cows' milk, and infant formula in the Boston area. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 89(7), pp. 3421-4.
Pearce EN, et al. Sources of Dietary Iodine: Bread, Cows' Milk, and Infant Formula in the Boston Area. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004;89(7):3421-4. PubMed PMID: 15240625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sources of dietary iodine: bread, cows' milk, and infant formula in the Boston area. AU - Pearce,Elizabeth N, AU - Pino,Sam, AU - He,Xuemei, AU - Bazrafshan,Hamid R, AU - Lee,Stephanie L, AU - Braverman,Lewis E, PY - 2004/7/9/pubmed PY - 2004/8/11/medline PY - 2004/7/9/entrez SP - 3421 EP - 4 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 89 IS - 7 N2 - Dietary iodine is essential for thyroid hormone production. Although U.S. dietary iodine is generally adequate, some groups, especially women of childbearing age, are at risk for mild iodine deficiency. Children's average urinary iodine is higher than that of adults. U.S. dietary iodine sources have not been assessed recently. A survey of iodine content in 20 brands of bread, 18 brands of cows' milk, and eight infant formulae was performed between 2001 and 2002. Three bread varieties contained more than 300 microg iodine per slice. Iodine content in other brands was far lower (mean +/- sd, 10.1 +/- 13.2 microg iodine/slice). All cows' milk samples had at least 88 microg iodine/250 ml, ranging from 88-168 microg (116.0 +/- 22.1 microg/250 ml). Infant formulae values ranged from 16.2 to 56.8 microg iodine/5 oz (23.5 +/- 13.78 microg/5 oz). The public should be aware of the need for adequate dietary iodine intake and should be aware that ingredient lists do not reflect the iodine content of foods. SN - 0021-972X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15240625/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2003-032002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -