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Risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons in the United States from 1999 to 2001.
J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Jul; 42(7):2944-51.JC

Abstract

Many studies have evaluated the role of Cryptosporidium spp. in outbreaks of enteric illness, but few studies have evaluated sporadic cryptosporidiosis in the United States. To assess the risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons, a matched case-control study was conducted in seven sites of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) involving 282 persons with laboratory-identified cryptosporidiosis and 490 age-matched and geographically matched controls. Risk factors included international travel (odds ratio [OR] = 7.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.7 to 22.0), contact with cattle (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.8 to 6.8), contact with persons >2 to 11 years of age with diarrhea (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.5 to 6.2), and freshwater swimming (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.049 to 3.5). Eating raw vegetables was protective (OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3 to 0.7). This study underscores the need for ongoing public health education to prevent cryptosporidiosis, particularly among travelers, animal handlers, child caregivers, and swimmers, and the need for further assessment of the role of raw vegetables in cryptosporidiosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Parasitic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd., Mailstop E52, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. str2@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15243043

Citation

Roy, Sharon L., et al. "Risk Factors for Sporadic Cryptosporidiosis Among Immunocompetent Persons in the United States From 1999 to 2001." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 42, no. 7, 2004, pp. 2944-51.
Roy SL, DeLong SM, Stenzel SA, et al. Risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons in the United States from 1999 to 2001. J Clin Microbiol. 2004;42(7):2944-51.
Roy, S. L., DeLong, S. M., Stenzel, S. A., Shiferaw, B., Roberts, J. M., Khalakdina, A., Marcus, R., Segler, S. D., Shah, D. D., Thomas, S., Vugia, D. J., Zansky, S. M., Dietz, V., & Beach, M. J. (2004). Risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons in the United States from 1999 to 2001. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 42(7), 2944-51.
Roy SL, et al. Risk Factors for Sporadic Cryptosporidiosis Among Immunocompetent Persons in the United States From 1999 to 2001. J Clin Microbiol. 2004;42(7):2944-51. PubMed PMID: 15243043.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons in the United States from 1999 to 2001. AU - Roy,Sharon L, AU - DeLong,Stephanie M, AU - Stenzel,Sara A, AU - Shiferaw,Beletshachew, AU - Roberts,Jacquelin M, AU - Khalakdina,Asheena, AU - Marcus,Ruthanne, AU - Segler,Suzanne D, AU - Shah,Dipti D, AU - Thomas,Stephanie, AU - Vugia,Duc J, AU - Zansky,Shelley M, AU - Dietz,Vance, AU - Beach,Michael J, AU - ,, PY - 2004/7/10/pubmed PY - 2004/8/20/medline PY - 2004/7/10/entrez SP - 2944 EP - 51 JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J. Clin. Microbiol. VL - 42 IS - 7 N2 - Many studies have evaluated the role of Cryptosporidium spp. in outbreaks of enteric illness, but few studies have evaluated sporadic cryptosporidiosis in the United States. To assess the risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons, a matched case-control study was conducted in seven sites of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) involving 282 persons with laboratory-identified cryptosporidiosis and 490 age-matched and geographically matched controls. Risk factors included international travel (odds ratio [OR] = 7.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.7 to 22.0), contact with cattle (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.8 to 6.8), contact with persons >2 to 11 years of age with diarrhea (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.5 to 6.2), and freshwater swimming (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.049 to 3.5). Eating raw vegetables was protective (OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3 to 0.7). This study underscores the need for ongoing public health education to prevent cryptosporidiosis, particularly among travelers, animal handlers, child caregivers, and swimmers, and the need for further assessment of the role of raw vegetables in cryptosporidiosis. SN - 0095-1137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15243043/full_citation L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15243043 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -