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Prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan; 59(1):35-40.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer and create statistically distinct prognostic groups of colorectal cancer patients based on clinical and nutritional variables.

DESIGN

A retrospective clinical epidemiologic study.

SETTING

A private tertiary care American Cancer Center.

SUBJECTS

In total, 234 colorectal cancer patients aged 29-82 y treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between January 1995 and March 2001.

INTERVENTION

SGA Questionnaire. SGA A-well nourished; SGA B-moderately malnourished; and SGA C-severely malnourished. Malnutrition was defined as either SGA B or SGA C.

RESULTS

The prevalence of malnutrition in this patient population, as determined by SGA, was 52% (113/217). The median survival of patients with SGA A was 12.8 months (95% CI; 9.1-16.5), those with SGA B was 8.8 months (95% CI; 6.7-10.9) and those with SGA C was 6 months (95% CI; 3.9-8.1); the difference being statistically significant at P=0.0013. Regression tree analysis identified prior treatment history, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and SGA to be important predictors of survival for our patient cohort. Patients with no prior treatment history (newly diagnosed disease), low LDH scores, and SGA A had the best overall survival of 40.4 months (95% CI; 30.45-50.4), whereas patients with prior treatment history (progressive disease), high LDH scores, and SGA B/C had the worst overall survival of 4.5 months (95% CI; 2.22-6.76).

CONCLUSION

The SGA provides useful prognostic information in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Zion, IL 60099, USA. digant.gupta@mrmc-ctca.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15252422

Citation

Gupta, D, et al. "Prognostic Significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 1, 2005, pp. 35-40.
Gupta D, Lammersfeld CA, Vashi PG, et al. Prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(1):35-40.
Gupta, D., Lammersfeld, C. A., Vashi, P. G., Burrows, J., Lis, C. G., & Grutsch, J. F. (2005). Prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(1), 35-40.
Gupta D, et al. Prognostic Significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(1):35-40. PubMed PMID: 15252422.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer. AU - Gupta,D, AU - Lammersfeld,C A, AU - Vashi,P G, AU - Burrows,J, AU - Lis,C G, AU - Grutsch,J F, PY - 2004/7/15/pubmed PY - 2005/4/9/medline PY - 2004/7/15/entrez SP - 35 EP - 40 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic significance of Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) in advanced colorectal cancer and create statistically distinct prognostic groups of colorectal cancer patients based on clinical and nutritional variables. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical epidemiologic study. SETTING: A private tertiary care American Cancer Center. SUBJECTS: In total, 234 colorectal cancer patients aged 29-82 y treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between January 1995 and March 2001. INTERVENTION: SGA Questionnaire. SGA A-well nourished; SGA B-moderately malnourished; and SGA C-severely malnourished. Malnutrition was defined as either SGA B or SGA C. RESULTS: The prevalence of malnutrition in this patient population, as determined by SGA, was 52% (113/217). The median survival of patients with SGA A was 12.8 months (95% CI; 9.1-16.5), those with SGA B was 8.8 months (95% CI; 6.7-10.9) and those with SGA C was 6 months (95% CI; 3.9-8.1); the difference being statistically significant at P=0.0013. Regression tree analysis identified prior treatment history, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and SGA to be important predictors of survival for our patient cohort. Patients with no prior treatment history (newly diagnosed disease), low LDH scores, and SGA A had the best overall survival of 40.4 months (95% CI; 30.45-50.4), whereas patients with prior treatment history (progressive disease), high LDH scores, and SGA B/C had the worst overall survival of 4.5 months (95% CI; 2.22-6.76). CONCLUSION: The SGA provides useful prognostic information in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15252422/Prognostic_significance_of_Subjective_Global_Assessment__SGA__in_advanced_colorectal_cancer_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602029 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -