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Oxidative stress, redox, and the tumor microenvironment.
Semin Radiat Oncol. 2004 Jul; 14(3):259-66.SR

Abstract

Cellular metabolism is critical for the generation of energy in biological systems; however, as a result of electron transfer reactions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in aerobic cells. Although low amounts of ROS are easily tolerated by the cell, abnormally high levels of ROS induce oxidative stress. ROS are also produced after exposure to ionizing radiation, selected chemotherapeutic agents, hyperthermia, inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, or depletion of cellular reductants such as NADPH and glutathione. Oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation produces a variety of highly reactive free radicals that damage cells, initiate signal transduction pathways, and alter gene expression. Cells are capable of countering the effects of oxidative stress by virtue of a complex redox buffering system. With respect to the radiation treatment of cancer, components of the cellular redox armamentarium may be targeted to enhance cell killing in the case of tumors and/or protection in the case of normal tissues.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15254869

Citation

Cook, John A., et al. "Oxidative Stress, Redox, and the Tumor Microenvironment." Seminars in Radiation Oncology, vol. 14, no. 3, 2004, pp. 259-66.
Cook JA, Gius D, Wink DA, et al. Oxidative stress, redox, and the tumor microenvironment. Semin Radiat Oncol. 2004;14(3):259-66.
Cook, J. A., Gius, D., Wink, D. A., Krishna, M. C., Russo, A., & Mitchell, J. B. (2004). Oxidative stress, redox, and the tumor microenvironment. Seminars in Radiation Oncology, 14(3), 259-66.
Cook JA, et al. Oxidative Stress, Redox, and the Tumor Microenvironment. Semin Radiat Oncol. 2004;14(3):259-66. PubMed PMID: 15254869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxidative stress, redox, and the tumor microenvironment. AU - Cook,John A, AU - Gius,David, AU - Wink,David A, AU - Krishna,Murali C, AU - Russo,Angelo, AU - Mitchell,James B, PY - 2004/7/16/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/7/16/entrez SP - 259 EP - 66 JF - Seminars in radiation oncology JO - Semin Radiat Oncol VL - 14 IS - 3 N2 - Cellular metabolism is critical for the generation of energy in biological systems; however, as a result of electron transfer reactions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in aerobic cells. Although low amounts of ROS are easily tolerated by the cell, abnormally high levels of ROS induce oxidative stress. ROS are also produced after exposure to ionizing radiation, selected chemotherapeutic agents, hyperthermia, inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, or depletion of cellular reductants such as NADPH and glutathione. Oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation produces a variety of highly reactive free radicals that damage cells, initiate signal transduction pathways, and alter gene expression. Cells are capable of countering the effects of oxidative stress by virtue of a complex redox buffering system. With respect to the radiation treatment of cancer, components of the cellular redox armamentarium may be targeted to enhance cell killing in the case of tumors and/or protection in the case of normal tissues. SN - 1053-4296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15254869/Oxidative_stress_redox_and_the_tumor_microenvironment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-4296(04)00052-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -