Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Caffeine attenuates waking and sleep electroencephalographic markers of sleep homeostasis in humans.
Neuropsychopharmacology. 2004 Oct; 29(10):1933-9.N

Abstract

Prolonged wakefulness increases electroencephalogram (EEG) low-frequency activity (< 10 Hz) in waking and sleep, and reduces spindle frequency activity (approximately 12-16 Hz) in non-rapid-eye-movement (nonREM) sleep. These physiologic markers of enhanced sleep propensity reflect a sleep-wake-dependent process referred to as sleep homeostasis. We hypothesized that caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, reduces the increase of sleep propensity during waking. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of caffeine and placebo on EEG power spectra during and after 40 h of wakefulness. A total of 12 young men underwent two periods of sleep deprivation. According to a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, they received two doses of caffeine (200 mg) or placebo after 11 and 23 h of wakefulness. Sleep propensity was estimated at 3-h intervals by measuring subjective sleepiness and EEG theta (5-8 Hz) activity, and polysomnographic recordings of baseline and recovery nights. Saliva caffeine concentration decreased from 15.7 micromol/l 16 h before the recovery night, to 1.8 micromol/l 1 h before the recovery night. Compared with placebo, caffeine reduced sleepiness and theta activity during wakefulness. Compared with sleep under baseline conditions, sleep deprivation increased 0.75-8.0 Hz activity and reduced spindle frequency activity in nonREM sleep of the recovery nights. Although caffeine approached undetectable saliva concentrations before recovery sleep, it significantly reduced EEG power in the 0.75-2.0 Hz band and enhanced power in the 11.25-20.0 Hz range relative to placebo. These findings suggest that caffeine attenuated the build-up of sleep propensity associated with wakefulness, and support an important role of adenosine and adenosine receptors in the homeostatic regulation of sleep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. landolt@pharma.unizh.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15257305

Citation

Landolt, Hans-Peter, et al. "Caffeine Attenuates Waking and Sleep Electroencephalographic Markers of Sleep Homeostasis in Humans." Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 29, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1933-9.
Landolt HP, Rétey JV, Tönz K, et al. Caffeine attenuates waking and sleep electroencephalographic markers of sleep homeostasis in humans. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2004;29(10):1933-9.
Landolt, H. P., Rétey, J. V., Tönz, K., Gottselig, J. M., Khatami, R., Buckelmüller, I., & Achermann, P. (2004). Caffeine attenuates waking and sleep electroencephalographic markers of sleep homeostasis in humans. Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 29(10), 1933-9.
Landolt HP, et al. Caffeine Attenuates Waking and Sleep Electroencephalographic Markers of Sleep Homeostasis in Humans. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2004;29(10):1933-9. PubMed PMID: 15257305.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine attenuates waking and sleep electroencephalographic markers of sleep homeostasis in humans. AU - Landolt,Hans-Peter, AU - Rétey,Julia V, AU - Tönz,Karin, AU - Gottselig,Julie M, AU - Khatami,Ramin, AU - Buckelmüller,Isabelle, AU - Achermann,Peter, PY - 2004/7/17/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/7/17/entrez SP - 1933 EP - 9 JF - Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology JO - Neuropsychopharmacology VL - 29 IS - 10 N2 - Prolonged wakefulness increases electroencephalogram (EEG) low-frequency activity (< 10 Hz) in waking and sleep, and reduces spindle frequency activity (approximately 12-16 Hz) in non-rapid-eye-movement (nonREM) sleep. These physiologic markers of enhanced sleep propensity reflect a sleep-wake-dependent process referred to as sleep homeostasis. We hypothesized that caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, reduces the increase of sleep propensity during waking. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of caffeine and placebo on EEG power spectra during and after 40 h of wakefulness. A total of 12 young men underwent two periods of sleep deprivation. According to a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, they received two doses of caffeine (200 mg) or placebo after 11 and 23 h of wakefulness. Sleep propensity was estimated at 3-h intervals by measuring subjective sleepiness and EEG theta (5-8 Hz) activity, and polysomnographic recordings of baseline and recovery nights. Saliva caffeine concentration decreased from 15.7 micromol/l 16 h before the recovery night, to 1.8 micromol/l 1 h before the recovery night. Compared with placebo, caffeine reduced sleepiness and theta activity during wakefulness. Compared with sleep under baseline conditions, sleep deprivation increased 0.75-8.0 Hz activity and reduced spindle frequency activity in nonREM sleep of the recovery nights. Although caffeine approached undetectable saliva concentrations before recovery sleep, it significantly reduced EEG power in the 0.75-2.0 Hz band and enhanced power in the 11.25-20.0 Hz range relative to placebo. These findings suggest that caffeine attenuated the build-up of sleep propensity associated with wakefulness, and support an important role of adenosine and adenosine receptors in the homeostatic regulation of sleep. SN - 0893-133X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15257305/Caffeine_attenuates_waking_and_sleep_electroencephalographic_markers_of_sleep_homeostasis_in_humans_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -