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Quantitative and reproducible murine model of excisional wound healing.
Wound Repair Regen 2004 Jul-Aug; 12(4):485-92WR

Abstract

The goal of animal wound healing models is to replicate human physiology and predict therapeutic outcomes. There is currently no model of wound healing in rodents that closely parallels human wound healing. Rodents are attractive candidates for wound healing studies because of their availability, low cost, and ease of handling. However, rodent models have been criticized because the major mechanism of wound closure is contraction, whereas in humans reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation are the major mechanisms involved. This article describes a novel model of wound healing in mice utilizing wound splinting that is accurate, reproducible, minimizes wound contraction, and allows wound healing to occur through the processes of granulation and reepithelialization. Our results show that splinted wounds have an increased amount of granulation tissue deposition as compared to controls, but the rate of reepithelialization is not affected. Thus, this model eliminates wound contraction and allows rodents' wounds to heal by epithelialization and granulation tissue formation. Given these analogies to human wound healing, we believe that this technique is a useful model for the study of wound healing mechanisms and for the evaluation of new therapeutic modalities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Surgery, New York University Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15260814

Citation

Galiano, Robert D., et al. "Quantitative and Reproducible Murine Model of Excisional Wound Healing." Wound Repair and Regeneration : Official Publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society, vol. 12, no. 4, 2004, pp. 485-92.
Galiano RD, Michaels J, Dobryansky M, et al. Quantitative and reproducible murine model of excisional wound healing. Wound Repair Regen. 2004;12(4):485-92.
Galiano, R. D., Michaels, J., Dobryansky, M., Levine, J. P., & Gurtner, G. C. (2004). Quantitative and reproducible murine model of excisional wound healing. Wound Repair and Regeneration : Official Publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society, 12(4), pp. 485-92.
Galiano RD, et al. Quantitative and Reproducible Murine Model of Excisional Wound Healing. Wound Repair Regen. 2004;12(4):485-92. PubMed PMID: 15260814.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantitative and reproducible murine model of excisional wound healing. AU - Galiano,Robert D, AU - Michaels,Joseph,5th AU - Dobryansky,Michael, AU - Levine,Jamie P, AU - Gurtner,Geoffrey C, PY - 2004/7/21/pubmed PY - 2004/11/13/medline PY - 2004/7/21/entrez SP - 485 EP - 92 JF - Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society JO - Wound Repair Regen VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - The goal of animal wound healing models is to replicate human physiology and predict therapeutic outcomes. There is currently no model of wound healing in rodents that closely parallels human wound healing. Rodents are attractive candidates for wound healing studies because of their availability, low cost, and ease of handling. However, rodent models have been criticized because the major mechanism of wound closure is contraction, whereas in humans reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation are the major mechanisms involved. This article describes a novel model of wound healing in mice utilizing wound splinting that is accurate, reproducible, minimizes wound contraction, and allows wound healing to occur through the processes of granulation and reepithelialization. Our results show that splinted wounds have an increased amount of granulation tissue deposition as compared to controls, but the rate of reepithelialization is not affected. Thus, this model eliminates wound contraction and allows rodents' wounds to heal by epithelialization and granulation tissue formation. Given these analogies to human wound healing, we believe that this technique is a useful model for the study of wound healing mechanisms and for the evaluation of new therapeutic modalities. SN - 1067-1927 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15260814/Quantitative_and_reproducible_murine_model_of_excisional_wound_healing_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1067-1927.2004.12404.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -