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Association of weight change, weight control practices, and weight cycling among women in the Nurses' Health Study II.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the association of weight cycling with weight change, weight control practices, and bulimic behaviors.

METHODS

A nested study of 2476 young and middle-aged women in the Nurses' Health Study II who provided information on intentional weight losses between 1989 and 1993.

SAMPLE

In total, 224 women who were severe cyclers, 741 women who were mild cyclers, 967 age- and BMI-matched controls (noncyclers), and 544 women who did not weight cycle and maintained their weight between 1989 and 1993 completed a questionnaire in 2000-2001 assessing recent intentional weight losses, weight control practices, and weight concerns.

RESULTS

After controlling for age and body mass index (BMI) in 1993, when weight cycling was initially assessed, mild cyclers gained an average of 6.7 pounds (lbs) more and severe cyclers gained approximately 10.3 lbs more than noncyclers between 1993 and 2001. Weight cyclers preferred to change their diet rather than to exercise to control their weight. Severe weight cyclers were less likely than noncyclers to use frequent exercise as a weight control strategy (odds ratio [OR]=0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-1.1). Cyclers were also more likely than noncyclers to engage in binge eating (mild cyclers: OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.4; and severe cyclers: OR=2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.5). Independent of weight cycling status, age, and BMI, women who engaged in binge eating gained approximately 5 lbs more than their peers (P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Weight cycling was associated with greater weight gain, less physical activity, and a higher prevalence of binge eating. Low levels of activity and binge eating may be partially responsible for the large amount of weight regained by weight cyclers.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Weight
    Bulimia
    Diet, Reducing
    Exercise
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Weight Gain
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15263922

    Citation

    Field, A E., et al. "Association of Weight Change, Weight Control Practices, and Weight Cycling Among Women in the Nurses' Health Study II." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 28, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1134-42.
    Field AE, Manson JE, Taylor CB, et al. Association of weight change, weight control practices, and weight cycling among women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004;28(9):1134-42.
    Field, A. E., Manson, J. E., Taylor, C. B., Willett, W. C., & Colditz, G. A. (2004). Association of weight change, weight control practices, and weight cycling among women in the Nurses' Health Study II. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 28(9), pp. 1134-42.
    Field AE, et al. Association of Weight Change, Weight Control Practices, and Weight Cycling Among Women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004;28(9):1134-42. PubMed PMID: 15263922.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association of weight change, weight control practices, and weight cycling among women in the Nurses' Health Study II. AU - Field,A E, AU - Manson,J E, AU - Taylor,C B, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Colditz,G A, PY - 2004/7/21/pubmed PY - 2004/11/4/medline PY - 2004/7/21/entrez SP - 1134 EP - 42 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. VL - 28 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of weight cycling with weight change, weight control practices, and bulimic behaviors. METHODS: A nested study of 2476 young and middle-aged women in the Nurses' Health Study II who provided information on intentional weight losses between 1989 and 1993. SAMPLE: In total, 224 women who were severe cyclers, 741 women who were mild cyclers, 967 age- and BMI-matched controls (noncyclers), and 544 women who did not weight cycle and maintained their weight between 1989 and 1993 completed a questionnaire in 2000-2001 assessing recent intentional weight losses, weight control practices, and weight concerns. RESULTS: After controlling for age and body mass index (BMI) in 1993, when weight cycling was initially assessed, mild cyclers gained an average of 6.7 pounds (lbs) more and severe cyclers gained approximately 10.3 lbs more than noncyclers between 1993 and 2001. Weight cyclers preferred to change their diet rather than to exercise to control their weight. Severe weight cyclers were less likely than noncyclers to use frequent exercise as a weight control strategy (odds ratio [OR]=0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-1.1). Cyclers were also more likely than noncyclers to engage in binge eating (mild cyclers: OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.4; and severe cyclers: OR=2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.5). Independent of weight cycling status, age, and BMI, women who engaged in binge eating gained approximately 5 lbs more than their peers (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Weight cycling was associated with greater weight gain, less physical activity, and a higher prevalence of binge eating. Low levels of activity and binge eating may be partially responsible for the large amount of weight regained by weight cyclers. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15263922/Association_of_weight_change_weight_control_practices_and_weight_cycling_among_women_in_the_Nurses'_Health_Study_II_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=15263922.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -