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Advancements in the battle against severe acute respiratory syndrome.
Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2004 Aug; 5(8):1687-93.EO

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache and dyspnoea. Respiratory failure is the major complication of SARS and approximately 20% of patients may progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring invasive mechanical ventilatory support. However, the severity is much milder in infected young children. Treatment of SARS was empirical in 2003 due to our limited understanding of this new disease. Protease inhibitors (lopinavir/ritonavir) in combination with ribavirin may play a role as antiviral therapy in the early phase, whereas the role of IFN and systemic steroid in preventing immune-mediated lung injury deserves further investigation. Knowledge of the genomic sequence of the SARS coronavirus has facilitated the development of rapid diagnostic tests. In addition, other antiviral treatment, RNA interference, monoclonal antibody, synthetic peptides, and vaccines are being developed. This paper provides a review of the epidemiology, clinical features and possible treatment strategies of SARS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15264983

Citation

Hui, David S C., and Gary W K. Wong. "Advancements in the Battle Against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome." Expert Opinion On Pharmacotherapy, vol. 5, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1687-93.
Hui DS, Wong GW. Advancements in the battle against severe acute respiratory syndrome. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2004;5(8):1687-93.
Hui, D. S., & Wong, G. W. (2004). Advancements in the battle against severe acute respiratory syndrome. Expert Opinion On Pharmacotherapy, 5(8), 1687-93.
Hui DS, Wong GW. Advancements in the Battle Against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2004;5(8):1687-93. PubMed PMID: 15264983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Advancements in the battle against severe acute respiratory syndrome. AU - Hui,David S C, AU - Wong,Gary W K, PY - 2004/7/22/pubmed PY - 2005/6/28/medline PY - 2004/7/22/entrez SP - 1687 EP - 93 JF - Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy JO - Expert Opin Pharmacother VL - 5 IS - 8 N2 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache and dyspnoea. Respiratory failure is the major complication of SARS and approximately 20% of patients may progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring invasive mechanical ventilatory support. However, the severity is much milder in infected young children. Treatment of SARS was empirical in 2003 due to our limited understanding of this new disease. Protease inhibitors (lopinavir/ritonavir) in combination with ribavirin may play a role as antiviral therapy in the early phase, whereas the role of IFN and systemic steroid in preventing immune-mediated lung injury deserves further investigation. Knowledge of the genomic sequence of the SARS coronavirus has facilitated the development of rapid diagnostic tests. In addition, other antiviral treatment, RNA interference, monoclonal antibody, synthetic peptides, and vaccines are being developed. This paper provides a review of the epidemiology, clinical features and possible treatment strategies of SARS. SN - 1744-7666 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15264983/Advancements_in_the_battle_against_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1517/14656566.5.8.1687 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -