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Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions.
J Neuroimmunol. 2004 Aug; 153(1-2):122-31.JN

Abstract

Microglia cells are the principal immune effector elements of the brain responding to any pathological event. To elucidate the possible role of microglia in initial non-inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, microglia from experimentally CDV infected dogs were isolated ex vivo by density gradient centrifugation and characterized immunophenotypically and functionally using flow cytometry. Results from dogs with demyelinating lesions were compared to results from recovered dogs and two healthy controls. CDV antigen could be detected in microglia of dogs with histopathologically confirmed demyelination. Microglia of these dogs showed marked upregulation of the surface molecules CD18, CD11b, CD11c, CD1c, MHC class I and MHC class II and a tendency for increased expression intensity of ICAM-1 (CD54), B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), whereas no increased expression was found for CD44 and CD45. Functionally, microglia exhibited distinctly enhanced phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was concluded that in CDV infection, there is a clear association between microglial activation and demyelination. This strongly suggests that microglia contribute to acute myelin destruction in distemper.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bischofsholer Damm 15, D-30173 Hannover, Germany. Veronika.Stein@tiho-hannover.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15265670

Citation

Stein, Veronika M., et al. "Microglial Cell Activation in Demyelinating Canine Distemper Lesions." Journal of Neuroimmunology, vol. 153, no. 1-2, 2004, pp. 122-31.
Stein VM, Czub M, Schreiner N, et al. Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions. J Neuroimmunol. 2004;153(1-2):122-31.
Stein, V. M., Czub, M., Schreiner, N., Moore, P. F., Vandevelde, M., Zurbriggen, A., & Tipold, A. (2004). Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions. Journal of Neuroimmunology, 153(1-2), 122-31.
Stein VM, et al. Microglial Cell Activation in Demyelinating Canine Distemper Lesions. J Neuroimmunol. 2004;153(1-2):122-31. PubMed PMID: 15265670.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions. AU - Stein,Veronika M, AU - Czub,Markus, AU - Schreiner,Nicole, AU - Moore,Peter F, AU - Vandevelde,Marc, AU - Zurbriggen,Andreas, AU - Tipold,Andrea, PY - 2003/11/05/received PY - 2004/03/24/revised PY - 2004/05/05/accepted PY - 2004/7/22/pubmed PY - 2004/9/21/medline PY - 2004/7/22/entrez SP - 122 EP - 31 JF - Journal of neuroimmunology JO - J. Neuroimmunol. VL - 153 IS - 1-2 N2 - Microglia cells are the principal immune effector elements of the brain responding to any pathological event. To elucidate the possible role of microglia in initial non-inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, microglia from experimentally CDV infected dogs were isolated ex vivo by density gradient centrifugation and characterized immunophenotypically and functionally using flow cytometry. Results from dogs with demyelinating lesions were compared to results from recovered dogs and two healthy controls. CDV antigen could be detected in microglia of dogs with histopathologically confirmed demyelination. Microglia of these dogs showed marked upregulation of the surface molecules CD18, CD11b, CD11c, CD1c, MHC class I and MHC class II and a tendency for increased expression intensity of ICAM-1 (CD54), B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), whereas no increased expression was found for CD44 and CD45. Functionally, microglia exhibited distinctly enhanced phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was concluded that in CDV infection, there is a clear association between microglial activation and demyelination. This strongly suggests that microglia contribute to acute myelin destruction in distemper. SN - 0165-5728 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15265670/Microglial_cell_activation_in_demyelinating_canine_distemper_lesions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165572804001626 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -