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Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction.
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul; 20(9):899-905.CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively.

OBJECTIVES

To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city.

METHODS

All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge.

RESULTS

Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients.

CONCLUSION

The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15266360

Citation

Jelinski, Susan E., et al. "Absence of Sex Differences in Pharmacotherapy for Acute Myocardial Infarction." The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, vol. 20, no. 9, 2004, pp. 899-905.
Jelinski SE, Ghali WA, Parsons GA, et al. Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction. Can J Cardiol. 2004;20(9):899-905.
Jelinski, S. E., Ghali, W. A., Parsons, G. A., & Maxwell, C. J. (2004). Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction. The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 20(9), 899-905.
Jelinski SE, et al. Absence of Sex Differences in Pharmacotherapy for Acute Myocardial Infarction. Can J Cardiol. 2004;20(9):899-905. PubMed PMID: 15266360.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction. AU - Jelinski,Susan E, AU - Ghali,William A, AU - Parsons,Gerry A, AU - Maxwell,Colleen J, PY - 2004/7/22/pubmed PY - 2004/9/21/medline PY - 2004/7/22/entrez SP - 899 EP - 905 JF - The Canadian journal of cardiology JO - Can J Cardiol VL - 20 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively. OBJECTIVES: To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city. METHODS: All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge. RESULTS: Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients. CONCLUSION: The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre. SN - 0828-282X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15266360/Absence_of_sex_differences_in_pharmacotherapy_for_acute_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/heartattack.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -