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Presentation of vitamin D deficiency.
Arch Dis Child 2004; 89(8):781-4AD

Abstract

AIMS

To describe the various ways in which vitamin D deficiency presents in children in selected districts of London and to identify which factors, if any, determine the mode of presentation.

METHODS

Retrospective review of patients presenting to Newham General, Royal London, Great Ormond Street, and King's College Hospitals between 1996 and 2001 with either hypocalcaemia or rickets caused by vitamin D deficiency. Children with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/l (10 ng/ml) were considered to have vitamin D deficiency.

RESULTS

Sixty five children, mostly from Black or Asian ethnic minority groups, were identified, 29 of whom had hypocalcaemic symptoms. Seventeen of these had no radiological evidence of rickets. The remainder (48 children) had radiological evidence of rickets with or without clinical signs. Symptoms and signs reverted to normal in all cases with vitamin D supplementation. All children who presented with symptomatic hypocalcaemia were aged either <3 or >10 years. There was a strong correlation between age at presentation and population growth velocity reference data.

CONCLUSIONS

Rickets remains a problem in the UK especially in "at risk" ethnic minority groups. Symptomatic hypocalcaemia is an important, but under-recognised presenting feature. Growth rate is likely to be an important factor in determining the mode of presentation. Unexplained hypocalcaemia should be attributed to vitamin D deficiency in "at risk" ethnic minority groups until proved otherwise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Newham General Hospital, Glen Road, Plaistow, London E13 8RU, UK. drshamez@aol.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15269083

Citation

Ladhani, S, et al. "Presentation of Vitamin D Deficiency." Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 89, no. 8, 2004, pp. 781-4.
Ladhani S, Srinivasan L, Buchanan C, et al. Presentation of vitamin D deficiency. Arch Dis Child. 2004;89(8):781-4.
Ladhani, S., Srinivasan, L., Buchanan, C., & Allgrove, J. (2004). Presentation of vitamin D deficiency. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 89(8), pp. 781-4.
Ladhani S, et al. Presentation of Vitamin D Deficiency. Arch Dis Child. 2004;89(8):781-4. PubMed PMID: 15269083.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Presentation of vitamin D deficiency. AU - Ladhani,S, AU - Srinivasan,L, AU - Buchanan,C, AU - Allgrove,J, PY - 2004/7/23/pubmed PY - 2004/8/21/medline PY - 2004/7/23/entrez SP - 781 EP - 4 JF - Archives of disease in childhood JO - Arch. Dis. Child. VL - 89 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: To describe the various ways in which vitamin D deficiency presents in children in selected districts of London and to identify which factors, if any, determine the mode of presentation. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients presenting to Newham General, Royal London, Great Ormond Street, and King's College Hospitals between 1996 and 2001 with either hypocalcaemia or rickets caused by vitamin D deficiency. Children with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/l (10 ng/ml) were considered to have vitamin D deficiency. RESULTS: Sixty five children, mostly from Black or Asian ethnic minority groups, were identified, 29 of whom had hypocalcaemic symptoms. Seventeen of these had no radiological evidence of rickets. The remainder (48 children) had radiological evidence of rickets with or without clinical signs. Symptoms and signs reverted to normal in all cases with vitamin D supplementation. All children who presented with symptomatic hypocalcaemia were aged either <3 or >10 years. There was a strong correlation between age at presentation and population growth velocity reference data. CONCLUSIONS: Rickets remains a problem in the UK especially in "at risk" ethnic minority groups. Symptomatic hypocalcaemia is an important, but under-recognised presenting feature. Growth rate is likely to be an important factor in determining the mode of presentation. Unexplained hypocalcaemia should be attributed to vitamin D deficiency in "at risk" ethnic minority groups until proved otherwise. SN - 1468-2044 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15269083/Presentation_of_vitamin_D_deficiency_ L2 - http://adc.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=15269083 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -