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Metformin, pre-eclampsia, and pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
Diabet Med 2004; 21(8):829-36DM

Abstract

AIMS

Was metformin during pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associated with pre-eclampsia, and was it safe for mother and neonate?

METHODS

In the current study, pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy outcomes were prospectively studied in 90 women with PCOS who conceived on metformin 1.5-2.55 g/day, and had > or = 1 live birth (97 pregnancies, 100 live births) compared with 252 healthy women (not known to have PCOS) with > or = 1 live birth, consecutively delivered in a community obstetrics practice.

RESULTS

Women with PCOS were older than controls (33 +/- 5 vs. 29 +/- 6 years, P < 0.0001), more likely to be > 35 years old at conception (23 vs. 13%, P = 0.028), much heavier (93 +/- 23 vs. 72 +/- 18 kg, P < 0.0001, BMI 33.8 +/- 7.8 kg/m2 vs. 25.6 +/- 5.9, P < 0.0001), and more likely to be Caucasian (97 vs. 90%, P = 0.05), but there were similar numbers with preconception Type 2 diabetes mellitus [2/90 (2.2%) vs. 1/252 (0.4%), P = 0.17]. Pre-eclampsia in PCOS (5/97 pregnancies, 5.2%), did not differ (P = 0.5) from controls (9/252, 3.6%), nor did it differ (P = 1.0) in PCOS vs. control primigravidas [2/45 (4.4%) vs. 4/91 (4.4%)]. Development of gestational diabetes in PCOS did not differ from controls [9/95 pregnancies (9.5%) vs. 40/251 (15.9%), P = 0.12]. Of the 100 live births to 90 women with PCOS, there were no major birth defects. Mean +/- sd birth weight of the 80 live births > or = 37 weeks gestation in women with PCOS (3414 +/- 486 g) did not differ from controls' 206 live births > or = 37 weeks (3481 +/- 555 g), P = 0.34, nor did the percentage of > or = 37 week gestation neonates > or = 4000 g (12.5 vs. 17.5%, P = 0.3) or > or = 4500 g (1.3 vs. 2.9%, P = 0.7).

CONCLUSIONS

Metformin is not associated with pre-eclampsia in pregnancy in women with PCOS, and appears to be safe for mother and fetus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cholesterol Center, Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. glueckch@healthall.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15270785

Citation

Glueck, C J., et al. "Metformin, Pre-eclampsia, and Pregnancy Outcomes in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 21, no. 8, 2004, pp. 829-36.
Glueck CJ, Bornovali S, Pranikoff J, et al. Metformin, pre-eclampsia, and pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Diabet Med. 2004;21(8):829-36.
Glueck, C. J., Bornovali, S., Pranikoff, J., Goldenberg, N., Dharashivkar, S., & Wang, P. (2004). Metformin, pre-eclampsia, and pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 21(8), pp. 829-36.
Glueck CJ, et al. Metformin, Pre-eclampsia, and Pregnancy Outcomes in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Diabet Med. 2004;21(8):829-36. PubMed PMID: 15270785.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metformin, pre-eclampsia, and pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Glueck,C J, AU - Bornovali,S, AU - Pranikoff,J, AU - Goldenberg,N, AU - Dharashivkar,S, AU - Wang,P, PY - 2004/7/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/7/24/entrez SP - 829 EP - 36 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet. Med. VL - 21 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: Was metformin during pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associated with pre-eclampsia, and was it safe for mother and neonate? METHODS: In the current study, pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy outcomes were prospectively studied in 90 women with PCOS who conceived on metformin 1.5-2.55 g/day, and had > or = 1 live birth (97 pregnancies, 100 live births) compared with 252 healthy women (not known to have PCOS) with > or = 1 live birth, consecutively delivered in a community obstetrics practice. RESULTS: Women with PCOS were older than controls (33 +/- 5 vs. 29 +/- 6 years, P < 0.0001), more likely to be > 35 years old at conception (23 vs. 13%, P = 0.028), much heavier (93 +/- 23 vs. 72 +/- 18 kg, P < 0.0001, BMI 33.8 +/- 7.8 kg/m2 vs. 25.6 +/- 5.9, P < 0.0001), and more likely to be Caucasian (97 vs. 90%, P = 0.05), but there were similar numbers with preconception Type 2 diabetes mellitus [2/90 (2.2%) vs. 1/252 (0.4%), P = 0.17]. Pre-eclampsia in PCOS (5/97 pregnancies, 5.2%), did not differ (P = 0.5) from controls (9/252, 3.6%), nor did it differ (P = 1.0) in PCOS vs. control primigravidas [2/45 (4.4%) vs. 4/91 (4.4%)]. Development of gestational diabetes in PCOS did not differ from controls [9/95 pregnancies (9.5%) vs. 40/251 (15.9%), P = 0.12]. Of the 100 live births to 90 women with PCOS, there were no major birth defects. Mean +/- sd birth weight of the 80 live births > or = 37 weeks gestation in women with PCOS (3414 +/- 486 g) did not differ from controls' 206 live births > or = 37 weeks (3481 +/- 555 g), P = 0.34, nor did the percentage of > or = 37 week gestation neonates > or = 4000 g (12.5 vs. 17.5%, P = 0.3) or > or = 4500 g (1.3 vs. 2.9%, P = 0.7). CONCLUSIONS: Metformin is not associated with pre-eclampsia in pregnancy in women with PCOS, and appears to be safe for mother and fetus. SN - 0742-3071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15270785/Metformin_pre_eclampsia_and_pregnancy_outcomes_in_women_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=15270785.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -