Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella vaccine among rural Chinese: compatibility with Western models of behavioral change.
Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2004 Mar; 35(1):97-108.SA

Abstract

Shigella remain a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, including China. In response, national and international researchers are actively working to develop vaccines that will be effective against dysentery and diarrhea caused by shigella dysentariae. With the growing recognition of the problems associated with sustained vaccine acceptance and usage, researchers and policy makers recognize the importance of conducting theory-based qualitative research to inform vaccine development program efforts. Accordingly we undertook this qualitative study involving 81 residents of one of China's rural communities with high rates of dysentery. The semi-structured interviews suggest that a Western model of behavioral change offered a useful research construct. Consistent with the model is the community's strong perception of 'response efficacy' of vaccines, particularly in comparison with water and sanitation and disease treatment. Residents were eager to vaccinate their children despite variable perception of disease severity, while they were less consistent in their interest in vaccinating adults; this enthusiasm for vaccinating children was attributed to China's 'one child per couple' policy. Intervention implications are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fudan University, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15272751

Citation

Youlong, Gong, et al. "Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella Vaccine Among Rural Chinese: Compatibility With Western Models of Behavioral Change." The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol. 35, no. 1, 2004, pp. 97-108.
Youlong G, Stanton BF, Von Seidlen L, et al. Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella vaccine among rural Chinese: compatibility with Western models of behavioral change. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2004;35(1):97-108.
Youlong, G., Stanton, B. F., Von Seidlen, L., Xueshan, F., & Nyamette, A. (2004). Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella vaccine among rural Chinese: compatibility with Western models of behavioral change. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 35(1), 97-108.
Youlong G, et al. Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella Vaccine Among Rural Chinese: Compatibility With Western Models of Behavioral Change. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2004;35(1):97-108. PubMed PMID: 15272751.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceptions of Shigella and of Shigella vaccine among rural Chinese: compatibility with Western models of behavioral change. AU - Youlong,Gong, AU - Stanton,Bonita F, AU - Von Seidlen,Lorenz, AU - Xueshan,Feng, AU - Nyamette,Andrew, PY - 2004/7/27/pubmed PY - 2004/10/22/medline PY - 2004/7/27/entrez SP - 97 EP - 108 JF - The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health JO - Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - Shigella remain a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, including China. In response, national and international researchers are actively working to develop vaccines that will be effective against dysentery and diarrhea caused by shigella dysentariae. With the growing recognition of the problems associated with sustained vaccine acceptance and usage, researchers and policy makers recognize the importance of conducting theory-based qualitative research to inform vaccine development program efforts. Accordingly we undertook this qualitative study involving 81 residents of one of China's rural communities with high rates of dysentery. The semi-structured interviews suggest that a Western model of behavioral change offered a useful research construct. Consistent with the model is the community's strong perception of 'response efficacy' of vaccines, particularly in comparison with water and sanitation and disease treatment. Residents were eager to vaccinate their children despite variable perception of disease severity, while they were less consistent in their interest in vaccinating adults; this enthusiasm for vaccinating children was attributed to China's 'one child per couple' policy. Intervention implications are discussed. SN - 0125-1562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15272751/Perceptions_of_Shigella_and_of_Shigella_vaccine_among_rural_Chinese:_compatibility_with_Western_models_of_behavioral_change_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -