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Comparison of first void urine and urogenital swab specimens for detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction in patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic.
Sex Transm Dis 2004; 31(8):499-507ST

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to compare urogenital swab specimens and first void urine (FVU) specimens from male and female patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic for the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis infections using in-house, inhibitor-controlled polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

STUDY DESIGN

Urethral swabs and FVU were collected from 1856 men and 753 women who also had a cervical swab collected. A positive diagnosis of infection was made if any 1 of the specimens tested positive and were confirmed in a second PCR assay targeting independent genes.

RESULTS

M. genitalium DNA and C. trachomatis DNA were detected in 126 (6.8%) and 246 (13.3%) of the male sample sets and in 51 (6.8%) and 73 (9.7%) of the female specimen sets, respectively. Using our in-house PCR and sample preparation methods, FVU was found to be the most sensitive diagnostic specimen for both pathogens, but for optimal sensitivity, it should be supplemented with a cervical specimen in women. In a small subset of female FVUs, storage at -20 degrees C led to false-negative M. genitalium PCR results in 27% of specimens found positive when a sample preparation was performed before freezing. The age-specific prevalence of M. genitalium in men was almost constant between 18 and 45 years of age in contrast to C. trachomatis infections, which were more common in younger men.

CONCLUSION

Urine appeared to be a better diagnostic specimen than the urethral swab for M. genitalium and C. trachomatis detection by PCR in this cohort of sexually transmitted disease clinic attendees but should be supplemented with a cervical specimen in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mycoplasma Laboratory, Department of Respiratory Infections, Meningitis, and Sexually Transmitted Infections, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark. jsj@ssi.dk

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15273584

Citation

Jensen, Jørgen Skov, et al. "Comparison of First Void Urine and Urogenital Swab Specimens for Detection of Mycoplasma Genitalium and Chlamydia Trachomatis By Polymerase Chain Reaction in Patients Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 31, no. 8, 2004, pp. 499-507.
Jensen JS, Björnelius E, Dohn B, et al. Comparison of first void urine and urogenital swab specimens for detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction in patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Sex Transm Dis. 2004;31(8):499-507.
Jensen, J. S., Björnelius, E., Dohn, B., & Lidbrink, P. (2004). Comparison of first void urine and urogenital swab specimens for detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction in patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 31(8), pp. 499-507.
Jensen JS, et al. Comparison of First Void Urine and Urogenital Swab Specimens for Detection of Mycoplasma Genitalium and Chlamydia Trachomatis By Polymerase Chain Reaction in Patients Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic. Sex Transm Dis. 2004;31(8):499-507. PubMed PMID: 15273584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of first void urine and urogenital swab specimens for detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction in patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic. AU - Jensen,Jørgen Skov, AU - Björnelius,Eva, AU - Dohn,Birthe, AU - Lidbrink,Peter, PY - 2004/7/27/pubmed PY - 2004/9/11/medline PY - 2004/7/27/entrez SP - 499 EP - 507 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 31 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare urogenital swab specimens and first void urine (FVU) specimens from male and female patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic for the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis infections using in-house, inhibitor-controlled polymerase chain reaction (PCR). STUDY DESIGN: Urethral swabs and FVU were collected from 1856 men and 753 women who also had a cervical swab collected. A positive diagnosis of infection was made if any 1 of the specimens tested positive and were confirmed in a second PCR assay targeting independent genes. RESULTS: M. genitalium DNA and C. trachomatis DNA were detected in 126 (6.8%) and 246 (13.3%) of the male sample sets and in 51 (6.8%) and 73 (9.7%) of the female specimen sets, respectively. Using our in-house PCR and sample preparation methods, FVU was found to be the most sensitive diagnostic specimen for both pathogens, but for optimal sensitivity, it should be supplemented with a cervical specimen in women. In a small subset of female FVUs, storage at -20 degrees C led to false-negative M. genitalium PCR results in 27% of specimens found positive when a sample preparation was performed before freezing. The age-specific prevalence of M. genitalium in men was almost constant between 18 and 45 years of age in contrast to C. trachomatis infections, which were more common in younger men. CONCLUSION: Urine appeared to be a better diagnostic specimen than the urethral swab for M. genitalium and C. trachomatis detection by PCR in this cohort of sexually transmitted disease clinic attendees but should be supplemented with a cervical specimen in women. SN - 0148-5717 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15273584/Comparison_of_first_void_urine_and_urogenital_swab_specimens_for_detection_of_Mycoplasma_genitalium_and_Chlamydia_trachomatis_by_polymerase_chain_reaction_in_patients_attending_a_sexually_transmitted_disease_clinic_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15273584 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -