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Seasonal changes in metabolic and temperature responses to cold air in humans.
Physiol Behav. 2004 Sep 15; 82(2-3):545-53.PB

Abstract

The metabolic and temperature response to mild cold were investigated in summer and winter in a moderate oceanic climate. Subjects were 10 women and 10 men, aged 19-36 years and BMI 17-32 kg/m2. Metabolic rate (MR) and body temperatures were measured continuously in a climate chamber with an ambient temperature of 22 degrees C for 1 h and subsequently 3 h of 15 degrees C. The average metabolic response during cold exposure, measured as the increase in kJ/min over time, was significantly higher in winter (11.5%) compared to summer (7.0%, P < .05). The temperature response was comparable in both seasons. The metabolic response in winter was significantly related to the response in summer (r2 = .47, P < .001). Total heat production during cold exposure was inversely related to the temperature response in both seasons (summer, r2 = .39, P < .01; winter r2 = .32, P < .05). In conclusion, the observed higher metabolic response in winter compared to summer indicates cold adaptation. The magnitude of the cold response varies, but the relative contribution of metabolic and temperature response was subject specific and consistent throughout the seasons, which can have implications for energy balance and body composition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, The Netherlands. m.vanooijen@HB.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15276821

Citation

van Ooijen, A M J., et al. "Seasonal Changes in Metabolic and Temperature Responses to Cold Air in Humans." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 82, no. 2-3, 2004, pp. 545-53.
van Ooijen AM, van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, van Steenhoven AA, et al. Seasonal changes in metabolic and temperature responses to cold air in humans. Physiol Behav. 2004;82(2-3):545-53.
van Ooijen, A. M., van Marken Lichtenbelt, W. D., van Steenhoven, A. A., & Westerterp, K. R. (2004). Seasonal changes in metabolic and temperature responses to cold air in humans. Physiology & Behavior, 82(2-3), 545-53.
van Ooijen AM, et al. Seasonal Changes in Metabolic and Temperature Responses to Cold Air in Humans. Physiol Behav. 2004 Sep 15;82(2-3):545-53. PubMed PMID: 15276821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal changes in metabolic and temperature responses to cold air in humans. AU - van Ooijen,A M J, AU - van Marken Lichtenbelt,W D, AU - van Steenhoven,A A, AU - Westerterp,K R, PY - 2004/01/15/received PY - 2004/05/03/revised PY - 2004/05/10/accepted PY - 2004/7/28/pubmed PY - 2005/2/18/medline PY - 2004/7/28/entrez SP - 545 EP - 53 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol Behav VL - 82 IS - 2-3 N2 - The metabolic and temperature response to mild cold were investigated in summer and winter in a moderate oceanic climate. Subjects were 10 women and 10 men, aged 19-36 years and BMI 17-32 kg/m2. Metabolic rate (MR) and body temperatures were measured continuously in a climate chamber with an ambient temperature of 22 degrees C for 1 h and subsequently 3 h of 15 degrees C. The average metabolic response during cold exposure, measured as the increase in kJ/min over time, was significantly higher in winter (11.5%) compared to summer (7.0%, P < .05). The temperature response was comparable in both seasons. The metabolic response in winter was significantly related to the response in summer (r2 = .47, P < .001). Total heat production during cold exposure was inversely related to the temperature response in both seasons (summer, r2 = .39, P < .01; winter r2 = .32, P < .05). In conclusion, the observed higher metabolic response in winter compared to summer indicates cold adaptation. The magnitude of the cold response varies, but the relative contribution of metabolic and temperature response was subject specific and consistent throughout the seasons, which can have implications for energy balance and body composition. SN - 0031-9384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15276821/Seasonal_changes_in_metabolic_and_temperature_responses_to_cold_air_in_humans_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -