Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children.
Dev Neuropsychol. 2004; 26(1):513-40.DN

Abstract

Neuropsychological functions were assessed in 174 children participating in a longitudinal study of low-level lead exposure. At age 5 1/2 years, children were administered the Working Memory and Planning Battery of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Testing Automated Battery. Measures of sociodemographic characteristics of the family, prenatal and perinatal risk, quality of caregiving and crowding in the home, and maternal and child intelligence were used as covariates to test the hypothesis that children with higher lifetime average blood lead concentrations would perform more poorly on tests of working memory, attentional flexibility, and planning and problem solving. The lifetime average blood lead level in this sample was 7.2 micrograms per deciliter (mug/dL; range: 0-20 mug/dL). Children with greater exposure performed more poorly on tests of executive processes. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, children with higher lifetime average blood lead concentrations showed impaired performance on the tests of spatial working memory, spatial memory span, intradimensional and extradimensional shifts, and an analog of the Tower of London task. Many of the significant associations remained after controlling for children's intelligence test scores, in addition to the other covariates. These findings indicate that the effects of pediatric lead exposure are not restricted to global indexes of general intellectual functioning, and executive processes may be at particular risk of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. rlc@cornell.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15276907

Citation

Canfield, Richard L., et al. "Impaired Neuropsychological Functioning in Lead-exposed Children." Developmental Neuropsychology, vol. 26, no. 1, 2004, pp. 513-40.
Canfield RL, Gendle MH, Cory-Slechta DA. Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children. Dev Neuropsychol. 2004;26(1):513-40.
Canfield, R. L., Gendle, M. H., & Cory-Slechta, D. A. (2004). Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children. Developmental Neuropsychology, 26(1), 513-40.
Canfield RL, Gendle MH, Cory-Slechta DA. Impaired Neuropsychological Functioning in Lead-exposed Children. Dev Neuropsychol. 2004;26(1):513-40. PubMed PMID: 15276907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impaired neuropsychological functioning in lead-exposed children. AU - Canfield,Richard L, AU - Gendle,Mathew H, AU - Cory-Slechta,Deborah A, PY - 2004/7/28/pubmed PY - 2004/9/9/medline PY - 2004/7/28/entrez SP - 513 EP - 40 JF - Developmental neuropsychology JO - Dev Neuropsychol VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - Neuropsychological functions were assessed in 174 children participating in a longitudinal study of low-level lead exposure. At age 5 1/2 years, children were administered the Working Memory and Planning Battery of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Testing Automated Battery. Measures of sociodemographic characteristics of the family, prenatal and perinatal risk, quality of caregiving and crowding in the home, and maternal and child intelligence were used as covariates to test the hypothesis that children with higher lifetime average blood lead concentrations would perform more poorly on tests of working memory, attentional flexibility, and planning and problem solving. The lifetime average blood lead level in this sample was 7.2 micrograms per deciliter (mug/dL; range: 0-20 mug/dL). Children with greater exposure performed more poorly on tests of executive processes. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, children with higher lifetime average blood lead concentrations showed impaired performance on the tests of spatial working memory, spatial memory span, intradimensional and extradimensional shifts, and an analog of the Tower of London task. Many of the significant associations remained after controlling for children's intelligence test scores, in addition to the other covariates. These findings indicate that the effects of pediatric lead exposure are not restricted to global indexes of general intellectual functioning, and executive processes may be at particular risk of lead-induced neurotoxicity. SN - 8756-5641 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15276907/Impaired_neuropsychological_functioning_in_lead_exposed_children_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1207/s15326942dn2601_8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -