Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Calcium from milk or calcium-fortified foods does not inhibit nonheme-iron absorption from a whole diet consumed over a 4-d period.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Single-meal studies have indicated that calcium inhibits iron absorption in humans. However, numerous dietary factors influence iron absorption, and the effect of calcium may not be as pronounced when calcium is served as part of a whole diet.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the effect of 3 sources of calcium served with the 3 main meals on nonheme-iron absorption from a 4-d diet.

DESIGN

(59)Fe absorption was estimated from whole-body retention measurements in 14 women aged 21-34 y, each of whom consumed four 4-d diets in a randomized crossover design. The diets differed in the source of calcium as follows: a basic diet (BD) with a low content of calcium (224 mg Ca/d), a BD with a glass of milk served at each meal (826 mg Ca/d), a BD with calcium lactate (802 mg Ca/d), and a BD with a milk mineral isolate containing calcium (801 mg Ca/d). The 2 latter calcium sources were added to selected foods of the BD (rye bread, white bread, chocolate cake, and orange juice), and these foods were consumed with the 3 meals. All diets provided 13.2 mg Fe/d.

RESULTS

No significant differences in nonheme-iron absorption were found between the BD and the BD supplemented with milk, calcium lactate, or the milk mineral isolate [7.4% (95% CI: 5.3%, 10.5%), 5.2% (3.5%, 7.9%), 6.7% (5.0%, 8.9%), and 5.1% (3.2%, 7.9%), respectively; P = 0.34].

CONCLUSION

Consumption of a glass of milk with the 3 main meals or of an equivalent amount of calcium from fortified foods does not decrease nonheme-iron absorption from a 4-d diet.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Human Nutrition, LMC Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Animals
    Calcium, Dietary
    Cross-Over Studies
    Diet
    Female
    Humans
    Intestinal Absorption
    Iron
    Milk

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15277162

    Citation

    Grinder-Pedersen, Lisbeth, et al. "Calcium From Milk or Calcium-fortified Foods Does Not Inhibit Nonheme-iron Absorption From a Whole Diet Consumed Over a 4-d Period." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 80, no. 2, 2004, pp. 404-9.
    Grinder-Pedersen L, Bukhave K, Jensen M, et al. Calcium from milk or calcium-fortified foods does not inhibit nonheme-iron absorption from a whole diet consumed over a 4-d period. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(2):404-9.
    Grinder-Pedersen, L., Bukhave, K., Jensen, M., Højgaard, L., & Hansen, M. (2004). Calcium from milk or calcium-fortified foods does not inhibit nonheme-iron absorption from a whole diet consumed over a 4-d period. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80(2), pp. 404-9.
    Grinder-Pedersen L, et al. Calcium From Milk or Calcium-fortified Foods Does Not Inhibit Nonheme-iron Absorption From a Whole Diet Consumed Over a 4-d Period. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(2):404-9. PubMed PMID: 15277162.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Calcium from milk or calcium-fortified foods does not inhibit nonheme-iron absorption from a whole diet consumed over a 4-d period. AU - Grinder-Pedersen,Lisbeth, AU - Bukhave,Klaus, AU - Jensen,Mikael, AU - Højgaard,Liselotte, AU - Hansen,Marianne, PY - 2004/7/28/pubmed PY - 2004/9/1/medline PY - 2004/7/28/entrez SP - 404 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 80 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Single-meal studies have indicated that calcium inhibits iron absorption in humans. However, numerous dietary factors influence iron absorption, and the effect of calcium may not be as pronounced when calcium is served as part of a whole diet. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of 3 sources of calcium served with the 3 main meals on nonheme-iron absorption from a 4-d diet. DESIGN: (59)Fe absorption was estimated from whole-body retention measurements in 14 women aged 21-34 y, each of whom consumed four 4-d diets in a randomized crossover design. The diets differed in the source of calcium as follows: a basic diet (BD) with a low content of calcium (224 mg Ca/d), a BD with a glass of milk served at each meal (826 mg Ca/d), a BD with calcium lactate (802 mg Ca/d), and a BD with a milk mineral isolate containing calcium (801 mg Ca/d). The 2 latter calcium sources were added to selected foods of the BD (rye bread, white bread, chocolate cake, and orange juice), and these foods were consumed with the 3 meals. All diets provided 13.2 mg Fe/d. RESULTS: No significant differences in nonheme-iron absorption were found between the BD and the BD supplemented with milk, calcium lactate, or the milk mineral isolate [7.4% (95% CI: 5.3%, 10.5%), 5.2% (3.5%, 7.9%), 6.7% (5.0%, 8.9%), and 5.1% (3.2%, 7.9%), respectively; P = 0.34]. CONCLUSION: Consumption of a glass of milk with the 3 main meals or of an equivalent amount of calcium from fortified foods does not decrease nonheme-iron absorption from a 4-d diet. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15277162/Calcium_from_milk_or_calcium_fortified_foods_does_not_inhibit_nonheme_iron_absorption_from_a_whole_diet_consumed_over_a_4_d_period_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/80.2.404 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -