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Psychological effects of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong on high-risk health care workers.
Can J Psychiatry. 2004 Jun; 49(6):391-3.CJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To quantify stress and the psychological impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on high-risk health care workers (HCWs).

METHOD

We evaluated 271 HCWs from SARS units and 342 healthy control subjects, using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) to assess stress levels and a structured list of putative psychological effects of SARS to assess its psychological effects. Healthy control subjects were balanced for age, sex, education, parenthood, living circumstances, and lack of health care experience.

RESULTS

Stress levels were raised in both groups (PSS = 18) but were not relatively increased in the HCWs. HCWs reported significantly more positive (94%, n = 256) and more negative psychological effects (89%, n = 241) from SARS than did control subjects. HCWs declared confidence in infection-control measures.

CONCLUSIONS

In HCWs, adaptive responses to stress and the positive effects of infection control training may be protective in future outbreaks. Elevated stress in the population may be an important indicator of future psychiatric morbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, SAR, China. sechua@hkucc.hku.hkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15283534

Citation

Chua, Siew E., et al. "Psychological Effects of the SARS Outbreak in Hong Kong On High-risk Health Care Workers." Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie, vol. 49, no. 6, 2004, pp. 391-3.
Chua SE, Cheung V, Cheung C, et al. Psychological effects of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong on high-risk health care workers. Can J Psychiatry. 2004;49(6):391-3.
Chua, S. E., Cheung, V., Cheung, C., McAlonan, G. M., Wong, J. W., Cheung, E. P., Chan, M. T., Wong, M. M., Tang, S. W., Choy, K. M., Wong, M. K., Chu, C. M., & Tsang, K. W. (2004). Psychological effects of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong on high-risk health care workers. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie, 49(6), 391-3.
Chua SE, et al. Psychological Effects of the SARS Outbreak in Hong Kong On High-risk Health Care Workers. Can J Psychiatry. 2004;49(6):391-3. PubMed PMID: 15283534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological effects of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong on high-risk health care workers. AU - Chua,Siew E, AU - Cheung,Vinci, AU - Cheung,Charlton, AU - McAlonan,Grainne M, AU - Wong,Josephine W S, AU - Cheung,Erik P T, AU - Chan,Marco T Y, AU - Wong,Michael M C, AU - Tang,Siu W, AU - Choy,Khai M, AU - Wong,Meng K, AU - Chu,Chung M, AU - Tsang,Kenneth W T, PY - 2004/7/31/pubmed PY - 2004/9/24/medline PY - 2004/7/31/entrez SP - 391 EP - 3 JF - Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie JO - Can J Psychiatry VL - 49 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To quantify stress and the psychological impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on high-risk health care workers (HCWs). METHOD: We evaluated 271 HCWs from SARS units and 342 healthy control subjects, using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) to assess stress levels and a structured list of putative psychological effects of SARS to assess its psychological effects. Healthy control subjects were balanced for age, sex, education, parenthood, living circumstances, and lack of health care experience. RESULTS: Stress levels were raised in both groups (PSS = 18) but were not relatively increased in the HCWs. HCWs reported significantly more positive (94%, n = 256) and more negative psychological effects (89%, n = 241) from SARS than did control subjects. HCWs declared confidence in infection-control measures. CONCLUSIONS: In HCWs, adaptive responses to stress and the positive effects of infection control training may be protective in future outbreaks. Elevated stress in the population may be an important indicator of future psychiatric morbidity. SN - 0706-7437 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15283534/Psychological_effects_of_the_SARS_outbreak_in_Hong_Kong_on_high_risk_health_care_workers_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/070674370404900609?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -