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Extracorporeal magnetic innervation treatment for urinary incontinence.
Int J Urol. 2004 Aug; 11(8):602-6.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI) is a new technology used for pelvic muscle strengthening for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. We explored whether this new technology is effective for patients with urge incontinence, as well as those with stress urinary incontinence.

METHODS

We studied 20 patients with urge incontinence and 17 patients with stress urinary incontinence. The Neocontrol system (Neotonus Inc., Marietta, GA) was used. Treatment sessions were for 20 min, twice a week for 8 weeks. Evaluations were performed by bladder diaries, one-hour pad weight testing, quality-of-life surveys and urodynamic studies.

RESULTS

Of the urge incontinence cases, five patients were cured (25.0%), 12 patients improved (60.0%) and three patients did not show any improvement (15.0%). Leak episodes per day reduced from 5.6 times to 1.9 times at 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Eight patients with urge incontinence recurred within 24 weeks after the last treatment (47.1%). Of the stress incontinence cases, nine patients were cured (52.9%), seven patients improved (41.1%) and one patient did not show any improvement (6%). In one-hour pad weight testing, the mean pad weight reduced from 7.9 g to 1.9 g at 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Three patients returned to the baseline values within 24 weeks after the last treatment (17.6%). No side-effects were experienced by any of the patients.

CONCLUSION

Although the results for urge incontinence were less effective than for stress urinary incontinence, ExMI therapy offers a new option for urge incontinence as well as stress urinary incontinence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry, Okayama 700-8558, Japan. uroyoko@md.okayama-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15285749

Citation

Yokoyama, Teruhiko, et al. "Extracorporeal Magnetic Innervation Treatment for Urinary Incontinence." International Journal of Urology : Official Journal of the Japanese Urological Association, vol. 11, no. 8, 2004, pp. 602-6.
Yokoyama T, Fujita O, Nishiguchi J, et al. Extracorporeal magnetic innervation treatment for urinary incontinence. Int J Urol. 2004;11(8):602-6.
Yokoyama, T., Fujita, O., Nishiguchi, J., Nozaki, K., Nose, H., Inoue, M., Ozawa, H., & Kumon, H. (2004). Extracorporeal magnetic innervation treatment for urinary incontinence. International Journal of Urology : Official Journal of the Japanese Urological Association, 11(8), 602-6.
Yokoyama T, et al. Extracorporeal Magnetic Innervation Treatment for Urinary Incontinence. Int J Urol. 2004;11(8):602-6. PubMed PMID: 15285749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extracorporeal magnetic innervation treatment for urinary incontinence. AU - Yokoyama,Teruhiko, AU - Fujita,Osamu, AU - Nishiguchi,Jun, AU - Nozaki,Kunihiro, AU - Nose,Hiroyuki, AU - Inoue,Miyabi, AU - Ozawa,Hideo, AU - Kumon,Hiromi, PY - 2004/8/3/pubmed PY - 2005/1/12/medline PY - 2004/8/3/entrez SP - 602 EP - 6 JF - International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association JO - Int. J. Urol. VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI) is a new technology used for pelvic muscle strengthening for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. We explored whether this new technology is effective for patients with urge incontinence, as well as those with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: We studied 20 patients with urge incontinence and 17 patients with stress urinary incontinence. The Neocontrol system (Neotonus Inc., Marietta, GA) was used. Treatment sessions were for 20 min, twice a week for 8 weeks. Evaluations were performed by bladder diaries, one-hour pad weight testing, quality-of-life surveys and urodynamic studies. RESULTS: Of the urge incontinence cases, five patients were cured (25.0%), 12 patients improved (60.0%) and three patients did not show any improvement (15.0%). Leak episodes per day reduced from 5.6 times to 1.9 times at 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Eight patients with urge incontinence recurred within 24 weeks after the last treatment (47.1%). Of the stress incontinence cases, nine patients were cured (52.9%), seven patients improved (41.1%) and one patient did not show any improvement (6%). In one-hour pad weight testing, the mean pad weight reduced from 7.9 g to 1.9 g at 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Three patients returned to the baseline values within 24 weeks after the last treatment (17.6%). No side-effects were experienced by any of the patients. CONCLUSION: Although the results for urge incontinence were less effective than for stress urinary incontinence, ExMI therapy offers a new option for urge incontinence as well as stress urinary incontinence. SN - 0919-8172 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15285749/Extracorporeal_magnetic_innervation_treatment_for_urinary_incontinence_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0919-8172&amp;date=2004&amp;volume=11&amp;issue=8&amp;spage=602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -