Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Specifying the influence of family and peers on violent victimization: extending routine activities and lifestyles theories.
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Sep; 19(9):1021-41.JI

Abstract

The fact that crime and victimization share similar correlates suggests that family and peer contexts are potentially useful for explaining individual differences in violent victimization. In this research, we used routine activities and lifestyles frameworks to reveal how strong bonds of family attachment can promote more effective guardianship while simultaneously making children less attractive as targets and limiting their exposure to motivated offenders. Conversely, the routine activities perspective suggests that exposure to delinquent peers will enhance risk. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we found that family and peer context variables do correspond with a higher risk of violent victimization among teenagers, net controls for unstructured and unsupervised activities and demographic characteristics. The role of family and peer group characteristics in predicting victimization risk suggests new theoretical directions for victimization research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Criminal Justice, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY 14623, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15296615

Citation

Schreck, Christopher J., and Bonnie S. Fisher. "Specifying the Influence of Family and Peers On Violent Victimization: Extending Routine Activities and Lifestyles Theories." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 19, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1021-41.
Schreck CJ, Fisher BS. Specifying the influence of family and peers on violent victimization: extending routine activities and lifestyles theories. J Interpers Violence. 2004;19(9):1021-41.
Schreck, C. J., & Fisher, B. S. (2004). Specifying the influence of family and peers on violent victimization: extending routine activities and lifestyles theories. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 19(9), 1021-41.
Schreck CJ, Fisher BS. Specifying the Influence of Family and Peers On Violent Victimization: Extending Routine Activities and Lifestyles Theories. J Interpers Violence. 2004;19(9):1021-41. PubMed PMID: 15296615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Specifying the influence of family and peers on violent victimization: extending routine activities and lifestyles theories. AU - Schreck,Christopher J, AU - Fisher,Bonnie S, PY - 2004/8/7/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/8/7/entrez SP - 1021 EP - 41 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 19 IS - 9 N2 - The fact that crime and victimization share similar correlates suggests that family and peer contexts are potentially useful for explaining individual differences in violent victimization. In this research, we used routine activities and lifestyles frameworks to reveal how strong bonds of family attachment can promote more effective guardianship while simultaneously making children less attractive as targets and limiting their exposure to motivated offenders. Conversely, the routine activities perspective suggests that exposure to delinquent peers will enhance risk. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we found that family and peer context variables do correspond with a higher risk of violent victimization among teenagers, net controls for unstructured and unsupervised activities and demographic characteristics. The role of family and peer group characteristics in predicting victimization risk suggests new theoretical directions for victimization research. SN - 0886-2605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15296615/Specifying_the_influence_of_family_and_peers_on_violent_victimization:_extending_routine_activities_and_lifestyles_theories_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260504268002?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -