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A prospective cohort study of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy in an upper gastrointestinal surgical unit.
Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug; 23(4):691-6.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIM

Feeding jejunostomy is recommended to facilitate early enteral nutrition after major upper gastrointestinal surgery. We aimed to determine the benefits and risks associated with routine practice of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) in high-risk upper gastrointestinal surgery.

METHOD

This is a prospective consecutive cohort study of 84 patients underwent feeding NCJ over a 3 years period in an Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit.

RESULTS

Feeding NCJ was placed after two-stage oesophago-gastrectomy in 24 patients (28.6%), after gastrectomy in 29 patients (34.5%), after liver resections in 7 patients (8.3%), pancreatic resection in 6 patients (7.1%), bile duct reconstruction in 8 patients (9.5%) and other operations in 10 patients (12%). The mean (SE) estimated nutritional requirement per 24 h was 1791 (31)kcal. Eighty-two patients (98%) started enteral feed on day 1 after surgery. Fifty-seven patients (68%) achieved the target nutritional requirements in 3 days. Four patients were discharged home on jejunal feed whilst only two patients required parenteral nutrition support. The rest tolerated full oral diet. There was no procedure related mortality. The morbidity related to feeding tube and feeding were 12.9% and 20%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Routine practice of feeding NCJ is safe. Their benefits outweigh the risks in a specialist centre.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15297107

Citation

Chin, Kin-Fah, et al. "A Prospective Cohort Study of Feeding Needle Catheter Jejunostomy in an Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 23, no. 4, 2004, pp. 691-6.
Chin KF, Townsend S, Wong W, et al. A prospective cohort study of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy in an upper gastrointestinal surgical unit. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(4):691-6.
Chin, K. F., Townsend, S., Wong, W., & Miller, G. V. (2004). A prospective cohort study of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy in an upper gastrointestinal surgical unit. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 23(4), 691-6.
Chin KF, et al. A Prospective Cohort Study of Feeding Needle Catheter Jejunostomy in an Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit. Clin Nutr. 2004;23(4):691-6. PubMed PMID: 15297107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective cohort study of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy in an upper gastrointestinal surgical unit. AU - Chin,Kin-Fah, AU - Townsend,Sara, AU - Wong,Wingzou, AU - Miller,Glenn V, PY - 2003/09/03/received PY - 2003/11/07/accepted PY - 2004/8/7/pubmed PY - 2005/4/13/medline PY - 2004/8/7/entrez SP - 691 EP - 6 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIM: Feeding jejunostomy is recommended to facilitate early enteral nutrition after major upper gastrointestinal surgery. We aimed to determine the benefits and risks associated with routine practice of feeding needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) in high-risk upper gastrointestinal surgery. METHOD: This is a prospective consecutive cohort study of 84 patients underwent feeding NCJ over a 3 years period in an Upper Gastrointestinal Surgical Unit. RESULTS: Feeding NCJ was placed after two-stage oesophago-gastrectomy in 24 patients (28.6%), after gastrectomy in 29 patients (34.5%), after liver resections in 7 patients (8.3%), pancreatic resection in 6 patients (7.1%), bile duct reconstruction in 8 patients (9.5%) and other operations in 10 patients (12%). The mean (SE) estimated nutritional requirement per 24 h was 1791 (31)kcal. Eighty-two patients (98%) started enteral feed on day 1 after surgery. Fifty-seven patients (68%) achieved the target nutritional requirements in 3 days. Four patients were discharged home on jejunal feed whilst only two patients required parenteral nutrition support. The rest tolerated full oral diet. There was no procedure related mortality. The morbidity related to feeding tube and feeding were 12.9% and 20%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Routine practice of feeding NCJ is safe. Their benefits outweigh the risks in a specialist centre. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15297107/A_prospective_cohort_study_of_feeding_needle_catheter_jejunostomy_in_an_upper_gastrointestinal_surgical_unit_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261561403002450 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -