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A case-control study of dietary and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in asthma.
Clin Exp Allergy 2004; 34(8):1232-6CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiological evidence suggests that increased dietary omega-6 and reduced omega-3 fatty acid intake, may have contributed to the rising prevalence of asthma, but these hypotheses have not been tested in studies comparing both dietary intake and objective measures of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

OBJECTIVE

To assess whether a higher intake of omega-6 or a lower intake of omega-3 fatty acids increases the risk of asthma, by measuring dietary fatty acid intake by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, as an objective biomarker of intake.

METHODS

We have compared individual fatty acid intake estimated by FFQ and by mass spectrometry of fasting erythrocyte cell membranes in 89 cases of asthma and 89 community-matched controls.

RESULTS

The odds of asthma were increased in relation to intake of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (odds ratio (OR) for difference between the 25th and 75th centiles of intake= 1.89, 95% CI 1.15-3.11) and docosahexaenoic acid (OR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.19-3.74). There was no evidence of any difference in erythrocyte membrane levels of omega-3 fatty acids, while the odds of asthma were reduced in relation to linoleic acid (omega-6) membrane levels (OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.21-0.95).

CONCLUSION

These findings suggest that dietary omega-3 fatty acids do not play a major role in protecting against asthma, and that higher levels of erythrocyte membrane linoleic acid are associated with a lower risk of asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Respiratory Medicine, University of Nottingham, Clinical Science Building, Nottingham, UK. emma@ejcbroad.fsnet.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15298563

Citation

Broadfield, E C., et al. "A Case-control Study of Dietary and Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acids in Asthma." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 34, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1232-6.
Broadfield EC, McKeever TM, Whitehurst A, et al. A case-control study of dietary and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34(8):1232-6.
Broadfield, E. C., McKeever, T. M., Whitehurst, A., Lewis, S. A., Lawson, N., Britton, J., & Fogarty, A. (2004). A case-control study of dietary and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in asthma. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 34(8), pp. 1232-6.
Broadfield EC, et al. A Case-control Study of Dietary and Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acids in Asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34(8):1232-6. PubMed PMID: 15298563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A case-control study of dietary and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in asthma. AU - Broadfield,E C, AU - McKeever,T M, AU - Whitehurst,A, AU - Lewis,S A, AU - Lawson,N, AU - Britton,J, AU - Fogarty,A, PY - 2004/8/10/pubmed PY - 2004/12/21/medline PY - 2004/8/10/entrez SP - 1232 EP - 6 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 34 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence suggests that increased dietary omega-6 and reduced omega-3 fatty acid intake, may have contributed to the rising prevalence of asthma, but these hypotheses have not been tested in studies comparing both dietary intake and objective measures of polyunsaturated fatty acids. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a higher intake of omega-6 or a lower intake of omega-3 fatty acids increases the risk of asthma, by measuring dietary fatty acid intake by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, as an objective biomarker of intake. METHODS: We have compared individual fatty acid intake estimated by FFQ and by mass spectrometry of fasting erythrocyte cell membranes in 89 cases of asthma and 89 community-matched controls. RESULTS: The odds of asthma were increased in relation to intake of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (odds ratio (OR) for difference between the 25th and 75th centiles of intake= 1.89, 95% CI 1.15-3.11) and docosahexaenoic acid (OR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.19-3.74). There was no evidence of any difference in erythrocyte membrane levels of omega-3 fatty acids, while the odds of asthma were reduced in relation to linoleic acid (omega-6) membrane levels (OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.21-0.95). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that dietary omega-3 fatty acids do not play a major role in protecting against asthma, and that higher levels of erythrocyte membrane linoleic acid are associated with a lower risk of asthma. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15298563/A_case_control_study_of_dietary_and_erythrocyte_membrane_fatty_acids_in_asthma_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0954-7894&date=2004&volume=34&issue=8&spage=1232 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -