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Medical Students' and Residents' preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting: a cross-sectional survey.
BMC Med Educ. 2004 Aug 06; 4:12.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Medical training is increasingly occurring in the ambulatory setting for final year medical students and residents. This study looks to identify if gender, school, level of training, or specialty affects learner's (final year medical students and residents) preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting.

METHODS

All final year medical students and residents at the five medical schools in Ontario (N = 3471) were surveyed about the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours most enhancing their learning in the ambulatory setting. Preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours were rank ordered. Factor analysis grouped the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours into themes which were then correlated with gender, school, level of training, and specialty.

RESULTS

Having an adequate number and variety of patients while being supervised by enthusiastic preceptors who give feedback and are willing to discuss their reasoning processes and delegate responsibility are site characteristics and preceptor behaviours valued by almost all learners. Some teaching strategies recently suggested to improve efficiency in the ambulatory teaching setting, such as structuring the interview for the student and teaching and reviewing the case in front of the patient, were found not to be valued by learners. There was a striking degree of similarity in what was valued by all learners but there were also some educationally significant differences, particularly between learners at different levels and in different specialties. Key findings between the different levels include preceptor interaction being most important for medical students as opposed to residents who most value issues pertaining to patient logistics. Learning resources are less valued early and late in training. Teaching and having the case reviewed in front of the patient becomes increasingly less valued as learners advance in their training. As one approaches the end of ones' training office management instruction becomes increasingly valued. Differences between specialties pertain most to the type of practice residents will ultimately end up in (ie: office based specialties particularly valuing instruction in office management and health care system interaction).

CONCLUSIONS

Preceptors need to be aware of, and make efforts to provide, teaching strategies such as feedback and discussing clinical reasoning, that learners have identified as being helpful for learning. If strategies identified as not being valued for learning, such as teaching in front of the patient, must continue it will be important to explore the barriers they present to learning. Although what all learners want from their preceptors and clinic settings to enhance their learning is remarkably similar, being aware of the educationally significant differences, particularly for learners at different levels and in different specialties, will enhance teaching in the ambulatory setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 5E9. kws@post.queensu.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15298710

Citation

Schultz, Karen W., et al. "Medical Students' and Residents' Preferred Site Characteristics and Preceptor Behaviours for Learning in the Ambulatory Setting: a Cross-sectional Survey." BMC Medical Education, vol. 4, 2004, p. 12.
Schultz KW, Kirby J, Delva D, et al. Medical Students' and Residents' preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting: a cross-sectional survey. BMC Med Educ. 2004;4:12.
Schultz, K. W., Kirby, J., Delva, D., Godwin, M., Verma, S., Birtwhistle, R., Knapper, C., & Seguin, R. (2004). Medical Students' and Residents' preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting: a cross-sectional survey. BMC Medical Education, 4, 12.
Schultz KW, et al. Medical Students' and Residents' Preferred Site Characteristics and Preceptor Behaviours for Learning in the Ambulatory Setting: a Cross-sectional Survey. BMC Med Educ. 2004 Aug 6;4:12. PubMed PMID: 15298710.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical Students' and Residents' preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting: a cross-sectional survey. AU - Schultz,Karen W, AU - Kirby,John, AU - Delva,Dianne, AU - Godwin,Marshall, AU - Verma,Sarita, AU - Birtwhistle,Richard, AU - Knapper,Chris, AU - Seguin,Rachelle, Y1 - 2004/08/06/ PY - 2003/12/08/received PY - 2004/08/06/accepted PY - 2004/8/10/pubmed PY - 2004/9/2/medline PY - 2004/8/10/entrez SP - 12 EP - 12 JF - BMC medical education JO - BMC Med Educ VL - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Medical training is increasingly occurring in the ambulatory setting for final year medical students and residents. This study looks to identify if gender, school, level of training, or specialty affects learner's (final year medical students and residents) preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting. METHODS: All final year medical students and residents at the five medical schools in Ontario (N = 3471) were surveyed about the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours most enhancing their learning in the ambulatory setting. Preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours were rank ordered. Factor analysis grouped the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours into themes which were then correlated with gender, school, level of training, and specialty. RESULTS: Having an adequate number and variety of patients while being supervised by enthusiastic preceptors who give feedback and are willing to discuss their reasoning processes and delegate responsibility are site characteristics and preceptor behaviours valued by almost all learners. Some teaching strategies recently suggested to improve efficiency in the ambulatory teaching setting, such as structuring the interview for the student and teaching and reviewing the case in front of the patient, were found not to be valued by learners. There was a striking degree of similarity in what was valued by all learners but there were also some educationally significant differences, particularly between learners at different levels and in different specialties. Key findings between the different levels include preceptor interaction being most important for medical students as opposed to residents who most value issues pertaining to patient logistics. Learning resources are less valued early and late in training. Teaching and having the case reviewed in front of the patient becomes increasingly less valued as learners advance in their training. As one approaches the end of ones' training office management instruction becomes increasingly valued. Differences between specialties pertain most to the type of practice residents will ultimately end up in (ie: office based specialties particularly valuing instruction in office management and health care system interaction). CONCLUSIONS: Preceptors need to be aware of, and make efforts to provide, teaching strategies such as feedback and discussing clinical reasoning, that learners have identified as being helpful for learning. If strategies identified as not being valued for learning, such as teaching in front of the patient, must continue it will be important to explore the barriers they present to learning. Although what all learners want from their preceptors and clinic settings to enhance their learning is remarkably similar, being aware of the educationally significant differences, particularly for learners at different levels and in different specialties, will enhance teaching in the ambulatory setting. SN - 1472-6920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15298710/Medical_Students'_and_Residents'_preferred_site_characteristics_and_preceptor_behaviours_for_learning_in_the_ambulatory_setting:_a_cross_sectional_survey_ L2 - https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6920-4-12 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -