Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Testicular, other genital, and breast cancers in first-degree relatives of testicular cancer patients and controls.

Abstract

Previous studies showed an increased prevalence of testicular cancer among fathers and brothers of testicular cancer patients. We examined whether testicular, other genital, and breast cancers aggregate in parents and siblings of testicular cancer patients in a population-based case-control study, including males, ages 15 to 69 years at diagnosis, with primary malignant tumors of the testes or extragonadal germ cell tumors. Controls were ascertained through the mandatory registries of residents and frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence. In a face-to-face interview, 269 cases and 797 controls provided health-related information on parents and siblings. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) based on the generalized estimating equations technique, adjusting for the matching variables and relatives' age. Three (1.1%) fathers and eight (3.2%) brothers of cases were affected with testicular cancer compared with four (0.5%) fathers and two (0.2%) brothers of controls. The OR (95% CI) of familial testicular cancer was 6.6 (2.35-18.77). Only nonseminoma patients had fathers with testicular cancer, whereas the affected brothers were all related to seminoma patients. Overall, we found an increased risk for genital other than testicular cancers (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.43-4.43). For breast cancer, we detected an increased risk in sisters (OR 9.5, 95% CI 2.01-45.16, adjusted for age of study participant and age of sister) but not in mothers. Our findings support the hypothesis that testicular and other genital cancers have a common familial component that may be due to genetic and shared exogenous factors such as estrogen exposure during fetal development.

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Institutes of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Essen, Essen, Germany. katja.bromen@cec.eu.int

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Breast Neoplasms, Male
    Case-Control Studies
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Family
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Genital Neoplasms, Male
    Germany
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Pedigree
    Prognosis
    Risk Assessment
    Seminoma
    Testicular Neoplasms

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15298952

    Citation

    Bromen, Katja, et al. "Testicular, Other Genital, and Breast Cancers in First-degree Relatives of Testicular Cancer Patients and Controls." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 13, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1316-24.
    Bromen K, Stang A, Baumgardt-Elms C, et al. Testicular, other genital, and breast cancers in first-degree relatives of testicular cancer patients and controls. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(8):1316-24.
    Bromen, K., Stang, A., Baumgardt-Elms, C., Stegmaier, C., Ahrens, W., Metz, K. A., & Jöckel, K. H. (2004). Testicular, other genital, and breast cancers in first-degree relatives of testicular cancer patients and controls. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 13(8), pp. 1316-24.
    Bromen K, et al. Testicular, Other Genital, and Breast Cancers in First-degree Relatives of Testicular Cancer Patients and Controls. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004;13(8):1316-24. PubMed PMID: 15298952.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Testicular, other genital, and breast cancers in first-degree relatives of testicular cancer patients and controls. AU - Bromen,Katja, AU - Stang,Andreas, AU - Baumgardt-Elms,Cornelia, AU - Stegmaier,Christa, AU - Ahrens,Wolfgang, AU - Metz,Klaus A, AU - Jöckel,Karl-Heinz, PY - 2004/8/10/pubmed PY - 2004/11/9/medline PY - 2004/8/10/entrez SP - 1316 EP - 24 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 13 IS - 8 N2 - Previous studies showed an increased prevalence of testicular cancer among fathers and brothers of testicular cancer patients. We examined whether testicular, other genital, and breast cancers aggregate in parents and siblings of testicular cancer patients in a population-based case-control study, including males, ages 15 to 69 years at diagnosis, with primary malignant tumors of the testes or extragonadal germ cell tumors. Controls were ascertained through the mandatory registries of residents and frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence. In a face-to-face interview, 269 cases and 797 controls provided health-related information on parents and siblings. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) based on the generalized estimating equations technique, adjusting for the matching variables and relatives' age. Three (1.1%) fathers and eight (3.2%) brothers of cases were affected with testicular cancer compared with four (0.5%) fathers and two (0.2%) brothers of controls. The OR (95% CI) of familial testicular cancer was 6.6 (2.35-18.77). Only nonseminoma patients had fathers with testicular cancer, whereas the affected brothers were all related to seminoma patients. Overall, we found an increased risk for genital other than testicular cancers (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.43-4.43). For breast cancer, we detected an increased risk in sisters (OR 9.5, 95% CI 2.01-45.16, adjusted for age of study participant and age of sister) but not in mothers. Our findings support the hypothesis that testicular and other genital cancers have a common familial component that may be due to genetic and shared exogenous factors such as estrogen exposure during fetal development. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15298952/Testicular_other_genital_and_breast_cancers_in_first_degree_relatives_of_testicular_cancer_patients_and_controls_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15298952 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -