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Genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors modulates anxiety in the shock-probe burying test.
Eur J Neurosci. 2004 Aug; 20(4):1059-64.EJ

Abstract

Cannabinoids affect various behavioral processes, including emotion, learning and memory, which may be specifically regulated through the CB1 receptors. The exact role CB1 receptors play in anxiety remains unclear. Both genetic and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors have produced inconsistent effects on anxiety. However, these studies examined passive avoidance as an index of anxiety. In the present study, both active and passive avoidance were examined using the shock-probe burying test while CB1 receptors were blocked genetically or pharmacologically. In the shock-probe burying test, anxiety is reflected by increased burying (increased active avoidance) and increased freezing (increased passive avoidance). In addition, probe-contacts may reflect cognitive performance and/or passive avoidance. As there have been few studies examining mouse behavior in the shock-probe burying test, experiment 1 was designed to pharmacologically validate this model in mice. Our results indicated that administration (i.p.) of chlordiazepoxide (4 mg/kg) or FG7412 (5 mg/kg) decreased and increased burying behavior, respectively, without affecting freezing or the number of probe contacts. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that both CB1 knockout mice and mice injected (i.p.) with 3 or 10 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg, of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A had lower burying scores, fewer contacts with the probe and similar freezing times compared with wild-type mice and mice injected with vehicle (experiments 2 and 3). Collectively, these results suggest that CB1 receptor blockade reduces some, but not all, aspects of anxiety. The decrease in probe contacts induced by CB1 receptor blockade may be due to enhanced cognition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Neuroscience Discovery Research, Indianapolis, IN, 46285-0510, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15305874

Citation

Degroot, Aldemar, and George G. Nomikos. "Genetic Deletion and Pharmacological Blockade of CB1 Receptors Modulates Anxiety in the Shock-probe Burying Test." The European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 20, no. 4, 2004, pp. 1059-64.
Degroot A, Nomikos GG. Genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors modulates anxiety in the shock-probe burying test. Eur J Neurosci. 2004;20(4):1059-64.
Degroot, A., & Nomikos, G. G. (2004). Genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors modulates anxiety in the shock-probe burying test. The European Journal of Neuroscience, 20(4), 1059-64.
Degroot A, Nomikos GG. Genetic Deletion and Pharmacological Blockade of CB1 Receptors Modulates Anxiety in the Shock-probe Burying Test. Eur J Neurosci. 2004;20(4):1059-64. PubMed PMID: 15305874.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors modulates anxiety in the shock-probe burying test. AU - Degroot,Aldemar, AU - Nomikos,George G, PY - 2004/8/13/pubmed PY - 2004/10/16/medline PY - 2004/8/13/entrez SP - 1059 EP - 64 JF - The European journal of neuroscience JO - Eur J Neurosci VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - Cannabinoids affect various behavioral processes, including emotion, learning and memory, which may be specifically regulated through the CB1 receptors. The exact role CB1 receptors play in anxiety remains unclear. Both genetic and pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors have produced inconsistent effects on anxiety. However, these studies examined passive avoidance as an index of anxiety. In the present study, both active and passive avoidance were examined using the shock-probe burying test while CB1 receptors were blocked genetically or pharmacologically. In the shock-probe burying test, anxiety is reflected by increased burying (increased active avoidance) and increased freezing (increased passive avoidance). In addition, probe-contacts may reflect cognitive performance and/or passive avoidance. As there have been few studies examining mouse behavior in the shock-probe burying test, experiment 1 was designed to pharmacologically validate this model in mice. Our results indicated that administration (i.p.) of chlordiazepoxide (4 mg/kg) or FG7412 (5 mg/kg) decreased and increased burying behavior, respectively, without affecting freezing or the number of probe contacts. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that both CB1 knockout mice and mice injected (i.p.) with 3 or 10 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg, of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A had lower burying scores, fewer contacts with the probe and similar freezing times compared with wild-type mice and mice injected with vehicle (experiments 2 and 3). Collectively, these results suggest that CB1 receptor blockade reduces some, but not all, aspects of anxiety. The decrease in probe contacts induced by CB1 receptor blockade may be due to enhanced cognition. SN - 0953-816X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15305874/Genetic_deletion_and_pharmacological_blockade_of_CB1_receptors_modulates_anxiety_in_the_shock_probe_burying_test_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0953-816X&date=2004&volume=20&issue=4&spage=1059 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -