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Sequential changes of serum aminotransferase levels in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Aug; 71(2):125-8.AJ

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerging infectious disease. To describe the hepatic injury caused by this disease, we report the sequential changes of serum transaminase in probable SARS patients during a hospital outbreak in southern Taiwan. From April to June, 2003, 52 probable SARS patients were hospitalized. Serial serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were retrospectively analyzed and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was also evaluated to correlate with the progression of this disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients had abnormal liver function during hospitalization. More than 70% of abnormal transaminase levels were mildly elevated. Most elevated levels were noted during the second week after onset of fever. Neither transaminase elevation nor HBsAg was related to the prognosis of SARS, and only advanced age was an independent predictor of poor outcome. Our study suggested that coronavirus causing SARS might induce liver damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15306699

Citation

Wu, Keng-Liang, et al. "Sequential Changes of Serum Aminotransferase Levels in Patients With Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 71, no. 2, 2004, pp. 125-8.
Wu KL, Lu SN, Changchien CS, et al. Sequential changes of serum aminotransferase levels in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004;71(2):125-8.
Wu, K. L., Lu, S. N., Changchien, C. S., Chiu, K. W., Kuo, C. H., Chuah, S. K., Liu, J. W., Lin, M. C., Eng, H. L., Chen, S. S., Lee, C. M., & Chen, C. L. (2004). Sequential changes of serum aminotransferase levels in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 71(2), 125-8.
Wu KL, et al. Sequential Changes of Serum Aminotransferase Levels in Patients With Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004;71(2):125-8. PubMed PMID: 15306699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sequential changes of serum aminotransferase levels in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. AU - Wu,Keng-Liang, AU - Lu,Sheng-Nan, AU - Changchien,Chi-Sin, AU - Chiu,King-Wah, AU - Kuo,Chung-Huang, AU - Chuah,Seng-Kee, AU - Liu,Jien-Wei, AU - Lin,Meng-Chih, AU - Eng,Hock-Liew, AU - Chen,Shun-Sheng, AU - Lee,Chuan-Mo, AU - Chen,Chao-Long, PY - 2004/8/13/pubmed PY - 2004/9/21/medline PY - 2004/8/13/entrez SP - 125 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 71 IS - 2 N2 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerging infectious disease. To describe the hepatic injury caused by this disease, we report the sequential changes of serum transaminase in probable SARS patients during a hospital outbreak in southern Taiwan. From April to June, 2003, 52 probable SARS patients were hospitalized. Serial serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were retrospectively analyzed and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was also evaluated to correlate with the progression of this disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients had abnormal liver function during hospitalization. More than 70% of abnormal transaminase levels were mildly elevated. Most elevated levels were noted during the second week after onset of fever. Neither transaminase elevation nor HBsAg was related to the prognosis of SARS, and only advanced age was an independent predictor of poor outcome. Our study suggested that coronavirus causing SARS might induce liver damage. SN - 0002-9637 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15306699/Sequential_changes_of_serum_aminotransferase_levels_in_patients_with_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -