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Human gender differences in an emotional visual oddball task: an event-related potentials study.
Neurosci Lett. 2004 Aug 26; 367(1):14-8.NL

Abstract

Pictures from the Ekman and Friesen series were used in an event-related potentials study to define the timing of occurrence of gender differences in the processing of positive (happy) and negative (fear) facial expressions. Ten male and 10 female volunteers were confronted with a visual oddball design, in which they had to detect, as quickly as possible, deviant happy or fearful faces amongst a train of standard stimuli (neutral faces). Behavioral results suggest that men and women detected fearful faces more quickly than happy ones. The main result is that the N2b component, functionally considered as an attentional orienting mechanism, was delayed in men for happy stimuli as compared with fearful ones. Gender differences observed in the processing of emotional stimuli could then originate at the attentional level of the information processing system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université Catholique de Louvain, Faculté de Psychologie-Unité NESC, Place du Cardinal Mercier, 10, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Salvatore.Campanella@psp.ucl.ac.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15308288

Citation

Campanella, S, et al. "Human Gender Differences in an Emotional Visual Oddball Task: an Event-related Potentials Study." Neuroscience Letters, vol. 367, no. 1, 2004, pp. 14-8.
Campanella S, Rossignol M, Mejias S, et al. Human gender differences in an emotional visual oddball task: an event-related potentials study. Neurosci Lett. 2004;367(1):14-8.
Campanella, S., Rossignol, M., Mejias, S., Joassin, F., Maurage, P., Debatisse, D., Bruyer, R., Crommelinck, M., & Guérit, J. M. (2004). Human gender differences in an emotional visual oddball task: an event-related potentials study. Neuroscience Letters, 367(1), 14-8.
Campanella S, et al. Human Gender Differences in an Emotional Visual Oddball Task: an Event-related Potentials Study. Neurosci Lett. 2004 Aug 26;367(1):14-8. PubMed PMID: 15308288.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human gender differences in an emotional visual oddball task: an event-related potentials study. AU - Campanella,S, AU - Rossignol,M, AU - Mejias,S, AU - Joassin,F, AU - Maurage,P, AU - Debatisse,D, AU - Bruyer,R, AU - Crommelinck,M, AU - Guérit,J M, PY - 2003/11/06/received PY - 2004/04/20/revised PY - 2004/05/18/accepted PY - 2004/8/17/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/8/17/entrez SP - 14 EP - 8 JF - Neuroscience letters JO - Neurosci Lett VL - 367 IS - 1 N2 - Pictures from the Ekman and Friesen series were used in an event-related potentials study to define the timing of occurrence of gender differences in the processing of positive (happy) and negative (fear) facial expressions. Ten male and 10 female volunteers were confronted with a visual oddball design, in which they had to detect, as quickly as possible, deviant happy or fearful faces amongst a train of standard stimuli (neutral faces). Behavioral results suggest that men and women detected fearful faces more quickly than happy ones. The main result is that the N2b component, functionally considered as an attentional orienting mechanism, was delayed in men for happy stimuli as compared with fearful ones. Gender differences observed in the processing of emotional stimuli could then originate at the attentional level of the information processing system. SN - 0304-3940 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15308288/Human_gender_differences_in_an_emotional_visual_oddball_task:_an_event_related_potentials_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304394004006652 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -