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Hormone levels in vegetarian and nonvegetarian teenage girls: potential implications for breast cancer risk.
Cancer Res. 1992 Feb 01; 52(3):578-83.CR

Abstract

Between September 1984 and June 1985, a total of 75 adolescent girls, 35 vegetarians residing in a Seventh-Day Adventist school and 40 nonvegetarians residing in a private non-Adventist boarding school, underwent measurement of their plasma hormone levels in the follicular and luteal phase of their menstrual cycles as well as dietary intake measured by 3-day food records, medical history, height, and weight. There were no significant differences between vegetarians and nonvegetarians in average age of the girls, weight, body mass index, age at menarche, years since the onset of menstruation, or percentage of girls with ovulatory cycles. Vegetarian girls had significantly higher levels of log follicular estradiol [2.00 +/- 0.27 (SD) versus 1.85 +/- 0.27 pg/ml, P less than or equal to 0.05] and luteal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHS) (1.88 +/- 0.71 versus 1.45 +/- 0.80 microgram/ml, P less than or equal to 0.05) than nonvegetarian girls. Follicular DHS was higher in vegetarians than in nonvegetarians (1.72 +/- 0.79 versus 1.45 +/- 0.95 microgram/ml), but the difference was not significant. The differences in follicular and luteal DHS, but not the difference in log estradiol, were significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) after controlling for ovulation, smoking, and alcohol intake with multivariable regression analysis. There were no significant differences in testosterone or in percentage free estradiol levels between vegetarians and nonvegetarians. Smoking was significantly associated with follicular and luteal DHS and with percentage free follicular estradiol, while alcohol use was significantly and inversely associated with percentage free follicular estradiol after controlling for other variables. The implications for breast cancer risk are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology/Biostatistics Program, School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago 60680.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1531038

Citation

Persky, V W., et al. "Hormone Levels in Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Teenage Girls: Potential Implications for Breast Cancer Risk." Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 3, 1992, pp. 578-83.
Persky VW, Chatterton RT, Van Horn LV, et al. Hormone levels in vegetarian and nonvegetarian teenage girls: potential implications for breast cancer risk. Cancer Res. 1992;52(3):578-83.
Persky, V. W., Chatterton, R. T., Van Horn, L. V., Grant, M. D., Langenberg, P., & Marvin, J. (1992). Hormone levels in vegetarian and nonvegetarian teenage girls: potential implications for breast cancer risk. Cancer Research, 52(3), 578-83.
Persky VW, et al. Hormone Levels in Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Teenage Girls: Potential Implications for Breast Cancer Risk. Cancer Res. 1992 Feb 1;52(3):578-83. PubMed PMID: 1531038.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hormone levels in vegetarian and nonvegetarian teenage girls: potential implications for breast cancer risk. AU - Persky,V W, AU - Chatterton,R T, AU - Van Horn,L V, AU - Grant,M D, AU - Langenberg,P, AU - Marvin,J, PY - 1992/2/1/pubmed PY - 1992/2/1/medline PY - 1992/2/1/entrez SP - 578 EP - 83 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res. VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - Between September 1984 and June 1985, a total of 75 adolescent girls, 35 vegetarians residing in a Seventh-Day Adventist school and 40 nonvegetarians residing in a private non-Adventist boarding school, underwent measurement of their plasma hormone levels in the follicular and luteal phase of their menstrual cycles as well as dietary intake measured by 3-day food records, medical history, height, and weight. There were no significant differences between vegetarians and nonvegetarians in average age of the girls, weight, body mass index, age at menarche, years since the onset of menstruation, or percentage of girls with ovulatory cycles. Vegetarian girls had significantly higher levels of log follicular estradiol [2.00 +/- 0.27 (SD) versus 1.85 +/- 0.27 pg/ml, P less than or equal to 0.05] and luteal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHS) (1.88 +/- 0.71 versus 1.45 +/- 0.80 microgram/ml, P less than or equal to 0.05) than nonvegetarian girls. Follicular DHS was higher in vegetarians than in nonvegetarians (1.72 +/- 0.79 versus 1.45 +/- 0.95 microgram/ml), but the difference was not significant. The differences in follicular and luteal DHS, but not the difference in log estradiol, were significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) after controlling for ovulation, smoking, and alcohol intake with multivariable regression analysis. There were no significant differences in testosterone or in percentage free estradiol levels between vegetarians and nonvegetarians. Smoking was significantly associated with follicular and luteal DHS and with percentage free follicular estradiol, while alcohol use was significantly and inversely associated with percentage free follicular estradiol after controlling for other variables. The implications for breast cancer risk are discussed. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1531038/Hormone_levels_in_vegetarian_and_nonvegetarian_teenage_girls:_potential_implications_for_breast_cancer_risk_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=1531038 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -