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In vivo elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion.
Am J Sports Med. 2004 Sep; 32(6):1415-20.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Most knowledge regarding cruciate ligament function is based on in vitro experiments.

PURPOSE

To investigate the in vivo elongation of the functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during weightbearing flexion.

HYPOTHESIS

The biomechanical role of functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament under in vivo loading is different from that measured in cadavers.

STUDY DESIGN

In vivo biomechanical study.

METHODS

Elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament was measured during a quasi-static lunge using imaging and 3-dimensional computer-modeling techniques.

RESULTS

The anterior-medial bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament had a relatively constant length from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion. The posterior-lateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament decreased in length with flexion. Both bundles of the posterior cruciate ligament had increased lengths with flexion.

CONCLUSION

The data did not demonstrate the reciprocal function of the 2 bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament or the posterior cruciate ligament with flexion observed in previous studies. Instead, the data suggest that there is a reciprocal function between the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament with flexion. The anterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in low-flexion angles, whereas the posterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in high flexion.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Understanding the biomechanical role of the knee ligaments in vivo is essential to reproduce the structural behavior of the ligament after injury (especially for 2-bundle reconstructions) and thus improve surgical outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bioengineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. gli1@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15310565

Citation

Li, Guoan, et al. "In Vivo Elongation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament During Knee Flexion." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 32, no. 6, 2004, pp. 1415-20.
Li G, DeFrate LE, Sun H, et al. In vivo elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion. Am J Sports Med. 2004;32(6):1415-20.
Li, G., DeFrate, L. E., Sun, H., & Gill, T. J. (2004). In vivo elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 32(6), 1415-20.
Li G, et al. In Vivo Elongation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament During Knee Flexion. Am J Sports Med. 2004;32(6):1415-20. PubMed PMID: 15310565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vivo elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion. AU - Li,Guoan, AU - DeFrate,Louis E, AU - Sun,Hao, AU - Gill,Thomas J, Y1 - 2004/07/20/ PY - 2004/8/18/pubmed PY - 2004/11/17/medline PY - 2004/8/18/entrez SP - 1415 EP - 20 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Most knowledge regarding cruciate ligament function is based on in vitro experiments. PURPOSE: To investigate the in vivo elongation of the functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during weightbearing flexion. HYPOTHESIS: The biomechanical role of functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament under in vivo loading is different from that measured in cadavers. STUDY DESIGN: In vivo biomechanical study. METHODS: Elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament was measured during a quasi-static lunge using imaging and 3-dimensional computer-modeling techniques. RESULTS: The anterior-medial bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament had a relatively constant length from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion. The posterior-lateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament decreased in length with flexion. Both bundles of the posterior cruciate ligament had increased lengths with flexion. CONCLUSION: The data did not demonstrate the reciprocal function of the 2 bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament or the posterior cruciate ligament with flexion observed in previous studies. Instead, the data suggest that there is a reciprocal function between the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament with flexion. The anterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in low-flexion angles, whereas the posterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in high flexion. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Understanding the biomechanical role of the knee ligaments in vivo is essential to reproduce the structural behavior of the ligament after injury (especially for 2-bundle reconstructions) and thus improve surgical outcomes. SN - 0363-5465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15310565/In_vivo_elongation_of_the_anterior_cruciate_ligament_and_posterior_cruciate_ligament_during_knee_flexion_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546503262175?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -